Confusing English Vocabulary – Barbecue (BBQ)

Michael Confusing Words, YouTube English Lessons 6 Comments

The weather is getting warmer and that can only mean one thing…it’s barbecue season. The word barbecue is interesting in English because it can be used as a verb, an adjective, and in two ways as a noun. A lot of English learners have trouble with this word, but not after watching this video. Check it out! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Confusing English Vocabulary – Borrow vs. Lend

Michael Confusing Words, YouTube English Lessons 4 Comments

A lot of English learners tell me that they have trouble using “borrow” and “lend.” Do you know the difference between these two words? Can you use them smoothly? For today’s English lesson, I’m going to show you a really easy way to remember this English vocabulary. Check it out! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

YouTube Lesson – Put On vs Take Off Vs Wear

Michael→ Confusing Words, YouTube English Lessons 4 Comments

Put on, take off, and wear are three verbs that a lot of English learners have trouble with. How about you? For today’s YouTube English Lesson, let’s look at the difference between these three verbs and learn how to use them in everyday English conversation and writing! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Find vs. Find Out – YouTube English Lesson

Michael→ Confusing Words, YouTube English Lessons 7 Comments

A lot of students tell me that they get confused about how to use FIND and FIND OUT. How about you? In this YouTube English lesson, I am going to show you the difference between these verbs, and give you examples so you can see how to use them. I hope you find it helpful! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today! Buy it nowSell online

4 Patterns Using Go and Prepositions – English Lesson

Michael Grammar Leave a Comment

I went to the office this morning. Before that, I wanted to get a bagel so I went to Zucker’s Bagel Shop for a bagel. I love their bagels and I always go there for a bagel. It’s hard to get really nice bagels where I live, so I need to go to Manhattan. Some of my friends also go drinking in Manhattan. There are a lot of nice clubs and bars there. Today, let’s have a look at four different English Grammar patterns using go and different prepositions. Pattern #1. We use go to + place I went to the office this morning. Jack went to France in 2010. Jen is going to Boston for the weekend. *Remember, we don’t need to use to when the destination is places like home, there, here, etc: I went home after work. Not, I went to home after work. Pattern #2. We use go + gerund (VerbING) + in/at Place. We usually use in + city/town, etc and at + shop name. The go + gerund shows the action that happens in/at the place: I go skiing in Vermont. Not, I go skiing to Vermont. Skiing is the action that happens in …

Agree With, Agree To, Agree On – English Grammar Lesson

Michael Grammar Leave a Comment

Do you have a good relationship with your coworkers? If so, I’d guess that you usually agree with them when they have an idea. If you can easily agree on something in the office, it makes your working relationships stronger. Of course it’s not always pleasant. Sometimes you have to agree to do things that you don’t really want to do, or you need to agree with ideas that you don’t really share, but that sort of compromise does keep you and your team working well. Today, let’s have a look at the various prepositions that collocate with the verb agree. We use agree with + a person, idea, or situation: I usually agree with my boss. Jack agreed with my idea of revising our catalog. I don’t agree with allowing professional athletes participate in the Olympics. We use agree to + verb: I never agreed to fix Jim’s computer. He must be mistaken. We agreed to lower the commission rate for just one month for that client. Thanks for agreeing to become a member of this website! Lastly, we use agree on + an idea or situation. The grammar is agree on + noun / gerund: Can we agree on meeting again next week at the same time? I hope you can agree on the terms of this …

Are vs. Do & Yes / No Questions – English Grammar Lesson

Michael Confusing Words, Grammar Leave a Comment

Are you interested in learning English? Are you a student, or working in an international company? Do you like learning language? Do you enjoy studying English grammar? If you have answered yes to any of these questions, you have come to the right place. A lot of my students have trouble with yes no questions. Today I am going to show you how to use these question words in English. There are several patterns you’ll need to memorize. Ready? The basic pattern using is and are is Are/Is + Subject + Object. Are you a student? Not, Do you a student? Are dogs good swimmers? Are the student’s happy? Is Jack the manager? Is your sister working today? Is that fun? You’ll notice that in the examples above, are & is are followed by a noun or pronoun, but not a verb. The basic pattern using do & does is Do/Does + Subject + Verb. Do you like English? Not, Are you like English? Do your friends study English? Do dogs swim well? Does Jack like pizza? Does your sister work in Manhattan? Does everyone enjoy this lesson? So if there is a verb after the subject you need to …

English Vocabulary Lesson – Learn The Difference Between Visit vs. Go

Michael Confusing Words, Vocabulary Leave a Comment

Building up your vocabulary is essential when you are learning a second language. In this English lesson, let’s look at the difference between Visit and Go. This will help you in your everyday English conversations, as well as on English tests such as the TOEIC exam. A lot of tourists visit New York City every year. Have you been here? I recommend you visit the Statue of Liberty and Central Park. Of course, you are always welcome to visit me! My friend Fraser came to visit me last month and we had a great time visiting the Top of the Rock. We went to Lombardi’s to eat pizza after that. Some of my students have trouble deciding whether to use visit or go, so today, I’m going to show you how to use visit. First of all, as a verb, visit means to go and see a person for social or official reasons. When you talk about one person going to see another person, it is also possible to use visit with: I visited my aunt last weekend. Fraser visited me on his way back to his hometown. The accounting manager is visiting with the marketing manager this afternoon. Jenny …

Basic English Grammar Lesson: Using Can

Michael Uncategorized 6 Comments

Can is a modal verb in English grammar, and has a few different meanings. Today, I am going to show you how we use can in both statements and questions. Can is used to show ability. It comes before the main verb in a sentence. I can sing and dance! Jack can speak three languages. This factory can produce 1,000 jackets per day. Can is used to ask about ability. It comes before the subject in a question. Can you sing and dance! Can Jack speak any foreign languages? Can this factory produce a lot of jackets? Can is used to show permission. It comes before the main verb in a sentence. I can leave work early today Jack can take this old PC if he wants it. Can is used to ask for permission. It comes before the subject in a question. Can I leave work early today? Can Jack take this old PC? He collects them! Can us used in a question to make a request: Can you help me? Hey boss. Can Jack come to the meeting with me? Can we have some more coffee, please? Can us also used in a question to make an offer: …

English Lesson: Feel, Look, Seem, Smell, Sound, & Taste

Michael Vocabulary 1 Comment

Some of my students have told me that they have trouble using the verbs of the senses, specifically, feel, look, seem, smell, sound, & taste. Today, I’m going to show you how to use these words in your conversation. We use these verbs feel, look, seem, smell, sound, & taste + an adjective: The silk scarf feels smooth. The new James Bond movie looks interesting. Let’s go see it. You seem tired. Are you ok? Does this cheese smell strange to you? That music sounds relaxing. Jack said the steak in this restaurant tastes delicious. We can also use those verbs with adverbs like so & too, and determiners like a little & a bit, etc plus an adjective: The silk scarf feels so smooth. The new James Bond movie looks so interesting. Let’s go see it. You seem a little tired. Are you ok? Does this cheese smell too strange to you? That music sounds too relaxing. I might fall asleep. The fried rice here tastes a bit salty. We also use these verbs + like + an noun phrase, like this: The silk scarf feels like a dream. The new James Bond movie looks like an interesting film. …