English Idiom Lesson: Have/Get a Handle On It Happy English NY

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If you have a handle on something, it means that you understand it and in the case of a situation, you have control of it. The structure is: [someone] has a handle on [something] Here are a few examples: -The work in the lab is complicated, but I have a handle on it. -Tom is always busy, but he seems to have a handle on his schedule. We can also say get a handle on something, or need to get a handle on something: -I can’t get a handle on this math problem. -We need to get a handle on the causes of global warming. What do you have a handle on? What do you need to get a handle on? If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

One-Point English Idiom lesson: Run Into

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When you’re out somewhere and you unexpectedly see someone you know, you can say that you ran into them. To run into someone means you meet someone you know by chance. The structure is run into + [someone]: – I ran into my cousin Tom at the mall. – We ran into Lucy’s mom yesterday. It’s been years since we have seen her. Who have you run into lately? If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Idiom Lesson “Chew The Fat” From Happy English New York!

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English Idiom: There are all kinds of conversations from very serious to very light. When you have a light, friendly chat with someone, you can say that you are chewing the fat with them. In terms of structure, “chew the fat” is used as a verb:  – We used to meet at the coffee shop and chew the fat for hours  – Ben and Jerry are always chewing the fat when they are drinking beer. Do you like to chew the fat? Leave a comment and let us know!

Idiom Lesson “Pooped” From Happy English New York!

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If you are really tired, as in exhausted, you can say that you are “pooped” or “pooped out.” “Pooped” or “pooped out” means you are very worn out and exhausted. – I’m pooped! Can we rest for a while? – Sam was so pooped out after the training session at the gym. – Are you ok? You look pooped? Be careful! You can say to someone, “you look pooped.” but not “you look like pooped.”  What makes you pooped out?

Idiom Lesson “Give it a shot” From Happy English New York!

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When you are ready to try something new, you can say you will give it a shot. The thing you are trying always goes in the middle, so the structure is give + [something] + a shot: – I’ve never gone snowboarding, but I think I want to give it a shot – If you don’t want to wear glasses, why not give Lasik a shot? You can also use this idiom to talk about people when it comes to a person joining a company or a team. -I just interviewed 3 people for the job, and I think I will give Brad a shot. (This means that among the three, Brad is the person you will give the job to.) -Hey coach, why don’t you give me a shot? (When you want to join a sports team, you can ask the coach to let you play using this idiom) Be careful! The structure is always give + someone/something + a shot. I have heard some students say things like, “I gave a shot to snowboarding.” This is not the correct structure. We don’t give a shot to something, we  give something a shot! So, it has to be, “I …

One-Point English Idiom Lesson – Sleep On It

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Do you need to sleep on it? When you need some time to make a decision, you can say, “…sleep on it.” A trip to the Bahamas sounds interesting, but let me sleep on it. When you talk to someone who needs time to make a decision, you can also use “…sleep on it.” You don’t need to tell me now. Why do you sleep on it and then let me know. Before buying that expensive car you should sleep on it. When you are the person who is directly saying you need more time, you can also use, I need to sleep on “that.” Bob: Jane, have you decided about the skiing trip? Jane: Not yet, let me sleep on that. But be careful! If you are not the person making the decision, you cannot say “sleep on that.” You need to use “sleep on it” Before buying that expensive car you should sleep on it. (not, “you should sleep on that”) I need more coffee this morning, and I don’t need to sleep on it!

18 – On the Back Burner – Business English Idiom Lesson

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 The back burner is the burner in the back of the stove. It doesn’t usually get used so much. So, when you put something on the back burner, something else has a higher priority. This is an idiom we can use in both business and in everyday life: – I was called in to a meeting by my boss, so my work has to be put on the back burner. – Sam got so busy travelling for work, he put going to the… gym on the back burner. Have you put something on the back burner recently?

One-Point English Lesson: Used To

Michael Grammar 4 Comments

I used to have a 1968 Ford Mustang. It was my first car. I used to drive it everywhere. One of my friends in those days had a 1970 Mustang, and we used to try and race each other.  Now, I drive a Jeep. It’s my first car with a stick shift. I am slowly getting used to driving it now, but when I first got it,  it was hard to get used to driving a shift car. I guess as time goes by I’ll be used to it, but no car will ever be as fun to drive as my ’68 Mustang. In English, used tohas two meanings and uses, and that is the pont for today’s One-Point English Class. Let’s have a look: I used to drive it everywhere. I used to eat cereal for breakfast everyday. I used to live in Japan. In these cases, used to refers to a past habit. When I was younger, I ate cereal for breakfast all the time. I dont eat cereal for breakfast anymore, it is not my habit anymore. So, I would say, “I used to eat cereal for breakfast.” In the above examples, used to describes a past habit. The grammar is used + [V Infinitive]: …

Present Vs. Present Progressive – One Point English Lesson

Michael Grammar 2 Comments

Here on Long Island, we are in the middle of a very cold winter. Today is especially cold. I am looking out the window into my garden. It looks cold! We have had a lot of snow as well. In fact, it snows every week, and it is snowing now. In my house, I am the one who has to shovel the snow. It looks like my neighbor is shoveling his driveway now, while it is snowing. I shovel after the snow has stopped. For today’s English lesson, we will look at basic verb tenses – simple present and present progressive. We will also look a bit at some stative verbs which can be used in simple or progressive forms. Simple Present is used in two ways. First, it is used when we make statements about “general facts”. General facts can be true in the past, in the present, and in the future: It looks cold outside. Today is Sunday. Snow falls from the sky. Secondly, we used simple present when we talk about our habits ore usual activities: I shovel after the snowstorm. My dog eats in the evening. Yalcin studies English an hour a day. Present Progressive is …

3 – See, Look, Watch – One Point English Lesson

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Let’s start off today’s free one-point English lesson with a quiz. Fill in the blanks with either “look (at)” “see” or “watch.” Yesterday I was ________ TV and I ________ a program about space. Since the beginning of time, humans have been ________ at the blinking lights night sky and wondering about them. I do too. I love to ________ into space at night. Going to Jones Beach, ________  a full moon rise, and ________  all of those stars is breathtaking. Sometimes, when you are stargazing, you might even ________ a shooting star. There are a lot of nice places here on Long Island where you can escape the lights of the city and ________ so many stars without ________ into a telescope. Maybe someday I can ________ you here, ________ at the sky! Here is the answer See, look, and watch are all very similar verbs in that they all describe what we do with our eyes. However, we use them differently. When you see something, it comes into your eyes with or without your effort. Seeing is the natural action of the eyes. Here are some examples: I just saw a shooting star (it came into my view) …