American Slang – Chicken Out, Wimp Out, Freeze Up and More!

Michael→ Idioms, Slang 2 Comments

American English Slang Learn Slang To Talk About Not Having Courage! Are you brave? Can you easily ask someone for a date or ask your boss for a raise? Sometimes, just before you are about to do something like that, you may lose your courage. Well, for today’s YouTube lesson, I’m going to show you some slang that we use to talk about these situations. Check it out! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

American Slang Lesson – Talking About The Winning Sports Team

Michael→ Idioms, Slang, YouTube English Lessons 4 Comments

Learn Slang & Idioms American Slang and Idioms to Talk About Sports When you watch sports, you can talk about the results of the game by saying Team A beat Team B. But using the slang in this lesson will make your English sound more colorful and your conversation more interesting to the listener. Check out today’s YouTube English lesson to learn how to use clobber, cream, whip, and mop the floor! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

15 New York Slang Expressions You May Hear When Visiting The Big Apple

Michael Idioms 2 Comments

I think every town has some words and phrases that make that town unique. Well, New York City is no exception. As a city of immigrants, a lot of words common in the immigrant communities became usual slang and casual expressions in everyday English, here in the Big Apple. Today, let’s have a look at some of this language! 1. Agita (n) [A-ji-duh]: (1) Heartburn from eating something. (2) A stressful feeling from aggravation because of another person’s words or actions. That pizza gave me agita. I can’t stand hanging out with Johnny. Just being near him gives me agita. 2. Boss (n) [Bawss]: A word that a deli clerk may use to address a male customer whose name he doesn’t know. What do you need, boss? How can I help you, boss? 3. Buck (n) [Buck]: US Dollar. Note that generally, $1 is pronounced “a buck.” I can’t believe he charged me a buck and a half ($1.50) for a cup of ice. The DVD’s are five bucks ($5) each. 4. Flying Rat (n) [FLY-ing-RAT] Pigeons. There were a whole bunch of flying rats in the park this morning. Look! It’s a flying rat! 5. Fuhgedaboudit (exclam.) [fuh-GED-uh-bow-dit] This …

English Lesson: Idioms from Sex And The City [Hook Up With]

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Today we will start looking at some idioms and slang from the hit HBO series, Sex and The City, Season 1, Episode 1. Careful, this program uses sexual language and topics. This English lesson is written for adults. Hook up with [someone] means to get together or make a connection with someone. There are generally two different ways to use this idiom, and each has its own nuance. Have a look at this line:  “Elizabeth was attractive and bright and right away she hooked up with one of the city’s typically eligible bachelors.” 1.  You can hook up with someone for romance or sex. In SATC, it seems like this is the implied meaning: Elizabeth hooked up with Joe. Tony went to the club with his friends because they wanted to hook up with some women. Did you hook up with anyone at your high school reunion?  2. You can hook up with someone for a hobby, interest, or a business service: My laptop broke, so Lori hooked me up with her computer tech. Paul McCartney first hooked up with John Lennon in art school. That is how The Beatles began. I’m trying to hook up with someone who likes …

English Lesson: Slang & Idioms At The Office

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Ted and Jenny work in the same office. Betty is their boss. Check out their conversation: Jenny: Hey Ted! What’s up. You look bummed. Ted: I am. I’ve been working 24/7 this week to finish the presentation for the big meeting next week. Jenny: So how is it going? Ted: Terrible. I showed it to Betty this week and she said it was no good. It really burns me up. Jenny: No way! Ted: Yeah, so now, I’m back to square one. Jenny: That stinks. I’m sorry to hear that. Now, let’s look at the slang and idioms used in the conversation: Bummed means disappointed. We often use be, seem & look with bummed” You look bummed. Ted seems bummed today. I wonder what happened. I’m bummed. My car broke down today. 24/7 (twenty-four/seven) means twenty-four hours per day, seven days per week. We use this both literally to refer to time, and figuratively to mean non-stop. The convenience store is open 24/7 (literal meaning: the store never closes) I’ve been working 24/7 this week to finish the presentation (figurative meaning: I have worked very hard and a lot of hours) Burns [someone] up means makes [someone] very upset. We …

English Idiom: Pull an All-Nighter!

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Have you ever pulled an all-nighter? When you stay awake all night to do something, we say you pull an all-nighter. You can pull an all-nighter to study for an exam, play video games, or drink alcohol. Joe pulled an all-nighter to study for his History exam, and he got an A! I got so focused on my game, that I didn’t realize I was pulling an all-nighter Since they had a three-day weekend, they decided to pull an all-nighter and stay at the bar downtown. Have you ever pulled an all-nighter? What were you doing?

English #Idiom Lesson: Luck out! @ Happy English

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Today we will look at an idiom which means being fortunate or suddenly lucky. You can use luck out in both situations. Here’s an example of being suddenly lucky: I lucked out at the train station. I got there late, but the train was also late so I was able to catch it. The show was sold out, but I lucked out at the box office. When I went there, they had a sudden cancellation, so I could get the last ticket. You can also luck out when you play a game or gamble: Joe lucked out in Vegas playing blackjack. I have never been able to luck out when betting on a horse race. Have you lucked out recently? Leave a comment and let us know! 

English Idiom “Have a ball” from Happy English NY

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Are you having a ball? Did you have a ball last weekend? If you have a ball, it means that you have a fun, exciting, and interesting time. You can follow this expression with a gerund (verb+ing). Here are some examples:      -We had a ball at the party last night! Thanks for inviting us.      -I had a ball sailing last summer, and looking forward to doing it again.      -Kids always have a ball when their parents are not home.      -Enjoy your trip to London. Have a ball! We also use the expression, have a blast to mean the same thing as have a ball.      -We had a blast at the party last night! Thanks for inviting us.      -I had a blast sailing last summer, and looking forward to doing it again. When was the last time you had a ball? What were you doing? Where were you? If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

English Idiom “Throw someone a Curve” from Happy English NY

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Have you ever been thrown a curve? If someone throws you a curve about something, it means that you were surprised in an unpleasant or negative way about something. The structure for this idiom is like this: Throw [someone] a curve (about something)     Here are some examples Angelina’s announcement that she was retiring threw the whole office a curve. Bob threw Betty a curve when he broke up with her. The boss threw me a curve about the new vacation policy. Similar to this is the idiom throw someone for a loop. If someone throws you for a loop, they say or do something unexpected. While this idiom is usually used for something unpleasant or negative, but it can also be used for something positive: The structure is [someone / something] threw [someone] for a loop. Here are some examples: The boss threw me for a loop when he offered me a promotion to manager. Bob threw Betty for a loop when he proposed to her. The news about the earthquake certainly threw everyone for a loop. Have you been thrown a curve recently? Has anyone thrown you for a loop? Let us know!

English Idiom Goof Off! From Happy English NY

Michael Idioms 2 Comments

Are you a goof off? Do you know someone who is a goof off? If you are a goof off, you are not serious about your work, or lazy, or more interested in playing than working. In this case, goof off is used as a noun.      -She used to be a goof off in high school, but became a serious student when she go to college      -Frank is such a goof off. He never finishes his work on time. We can also use goof off as a verb and it has the same meaning. For example:      -Angela got fired from her job because she goofed off all time and missed a lot of deadlines.      -If you keep goofing off, you won’t get into a good university. Turn off the XBOX and go do your homework! Do you know someone who is a goof off? Did you goof off in high school? Leave us a comment here! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!