How to Read, Pronounce, & Write Fractions in English

Michael Pronunciation 1 Comment

Today, let’s have a look at how to read and pronounce fractions in English. Outside of the math class and in the real world fractions are useful for buying things and talking about distance. So let’s begin! Basically, we use cardinal numbers (like 1, 2, 3, 4) to read the figure on the top of the fraction, and ordinal numbers (like third, fourth, fifth) to read the figure on the bottom of the fraction. When we write the fraction in words, we use a hyphen between the cardinal number and the ordinal number. Here are some examples: We pronounce 1/3 as one-third, 1/4 as one-fourth, and 1/8 as one-eighth. As well, “a” means “one” so: We pronounce 1/3 as a third, 1/4 as a fourth, and 1/8 as an eighth (written without the hyphen.) In English grammar, ordinal numbers are countable, so you need to add “s” to the word: We pronounce 2/3 as two-thirds, 3/4 as three-fourths, and 6/8 as six-eighths. We have special words to talk about fractions that have “2” and “4” on the bottom: We pronounce 1/2 as one-half, 1/4 as one-quarter, and 3/4 as three-quarters. Here are some examples on how you might use fractions …

Free English Pronunciation Lesson with Mp3 Audio: A Bottle Of Red

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In American English, and especially here in the New York area, we tend to pronounce things a bit faster and more connected than people do in other parts of the country. Today, I want to show you how we pronounce of when of is used in a noun of noun pattern, and the /t/ sound when it falls in the middle of a word. We’ll get a little help from Billy Joel. When of is used between nouns, it is generally pronounced like the short /a/ sound as in apartment or /uh/ as in under. For example, the phrase a cup of coffee is pronounced a cup a coffee. Here are a few more examples: STANDARD PRONUNCIATION USUAL PRONUNCIATION a can of beer a can a beer a bag of chips a bag a chips a box of cookies a box a cookies a glass of wine a glass a wine a piece of cheese a piece a cheese The second point today is the /t/ sound. When the letter t comes in the middle of a word, it is usually pronounced like the /d/ in head or read. For example, the phrase a little cat is pronounced a liddle …

Free English Pronunciation Lesson: The /ər/ Sound

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The /ər/ sound can be tricky because there are several ways to spell this sound. For example: earth [ear]            bird [ir]            word [or]            curtain [ur] Words with the /ər/ sound bird dirt hurt shirt birthday earth learn sir church earl lurk splurge curd fir occur stir curl firm pearl turkey curse fur perk turn curt heard purr word curtain hurl reword work Words with similar sounds all – earl charge – church hall – hurl saw – sir barn – burn cord – curd hard – heard short – shirt board – bird core – occur heart – hurt store – stir born – burn course – curse large – splurge talk – Turk call – curl dark – dirt lark – lurk torn – turn card – curd far – fur lawn – learn walk – work carton – curtain farm – firm park – perk warm – worm caught – curt four – fir Paul – pearl wart – worth Sentences with the /ər/ sound The dirty birds squirmed when Kurt perched on the birch tree. I heard Burt cursed when he burned his dirty shirt. Is it worth the work to reword the first bird story? The …

English Pronunciation Lesson: /s/ vs. /ʃ/ (s vs sh)

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1) The basic sounds: It’s a ssssssssssnake! When you talk in the library, the librarian will say, “Shhhhhhhhhh” 2) Look at these pairs of words: see – she sue – shoe save – shave sit – shit 3) Sentence practice #1                      [ /s/   (ess) ]                                                        I see seven swans. Sue said Sam was sick. Steve saves stamps and coins. Can I sit here? Can someone sit here?                    [ /ʃ/  (sh) ]  She should shake it.  We shop for shoes and shirts  Should Tosh shave his mustache?  Shelly should clean the shed. 4) Sentence practice #2 Sue shops for Sam’s shoes. Steve should see the shimmering scene. Steve shall sell his stamps to buy shoes. She sells sea shells by the sea shore. Remember, the key to pronunciation is listening, so listen to the video here and listen to English every day! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

English Pronunciation of Money Lesson: How to Pronounce Dollar Amounts

Michael Pronunciation 2 Comments

When you go shopping, it is important to be able to say and listen to the amounts of money correctly. Here are some basic examples: $1 – a dollar or one dollar. $3 – three dollars. *not three dollar $50 – fifty dollars. *not fifty dollar The nickname for the US Dollar is buck. We use buck when we speak in a casual situation: $1 – a buck. *one buck is less common $3 – three bucks. $50 – fifty bucks. When the amount has dollars and cents, we pronounce the amount in two ways. Remember, the [.] is pronounced [and] when we pronounce money: #1 – the long way $1.33 – one dollar and thirty-three cents. $13.79 – thirteen dollars and seventy-nine cents. $110. 99 – one hundred ten dollars and ninety-nine cents.  #2 – the short way $1.33 – one thirty-three. $13.79 – thirteen seventy-nine. $110. 99 – one ten ninety-nine. If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

iPhone App Review: Pronunciation Tutor TH App

Michael Uncategorized Leave a Comment

I’ve just gotten a copy of the Pronunciation Tutor /TH/ app by Keen Research for the iPhone. This app focuses on teaching the pronunciation of the /TH/ sound as in “Think,” which is often confused with the /t/ sound as in “tank,” the /d/ sound as in “dink,” the /s/ sound as in “sink,” and the /z/ sound as in “zinc.” If you are looking to improve your pronunciation of the “TH” sound, I suggest you get this app. The reason this app is effective is because it first gives you the opportunity to learn to recognize the /TH/ sound and distinguish it from the /t/, /d/, /s/, and /z/ sounds. Listening is a key element in learning proper pronunciation and the Pronunciation Tutor /TH/ app provides many opportunities for listening practice. There is a listening test which has 50 examples of the /TH/ and /t/, /d/, /s/, /z/ sounds in single words and words in sentences. There are also three levels of practice exercises which test your understanding and ability to differentiate between Voiceless TH and T, Voiceless TH and s, Voiced Th and D, and Voiced Th and z. Can you recognize the differences between these sounds?   There are …

English Lesson: Want to & Want a Vs. Wanna

Michael Uncategorized 17 Comments

The other day we looked at gonna, the casual pronunciation of going to. Today, I want to talk about a similar word – wanna. Wanna is the casual pronunciation of both want to and want a. I am sure you have heard this before. However, what you might not know is that there are times when we can and cannot use such pronunciation. Today I want to talk about this with you. We pronounce want to as wanna when we talk about the first and second person (I, you, we, they) but not the third person (he, she, it). The structure is want to + verb.  Here are some examples: I want to eat pizza for lunch. → I wanna eat pizza for lunch. (wanna = want to) I think you want to eat pizza for lunch, too. →I think you wanna eat pizza for lunch, too. (wanna = want to) Jack wants to* eat pizza for lunch → Jack wanna to eat pizza for lunch. (wanna ≠ want to)          *Since we use the third person “s” we cannot use wanna to mean wants to We also pronounce want a as wanna when we talk about the first and …

English Lesson: Going to Vs. Gonna

Michael Confusing Words, Grammar, Pronunciation 7 Comments

I’m sure that you have learned that in everyday casual English we pronounce going to as gonna. What you might not know is that there are times when we can and cannot use such pronunciation. Today I want to talk about this with you. Be going to is used in a few different ways in English. First, we can use be going to + verb to talk about definite future plans. We can use the pronunciation gonna here: I am going to go to Boston next week – OR  – I am gonna go to Boston next week Jack said he is going to get a dog – OR – Jack said he is gonna get a dog. Be going to is also used when we talk about our present action or future plan. We use be going to + place. In this case, we cannot say gonna   I’m going to Boston next week – NOT  – I’m gonna Boston next week Jack said he’s going to the pest store – NOT  – Jack said he’s gonna the pet store Be going is also used when we talk about our present action or future plan. We use be going …