Present Perfect vs. Simple Past – English Grammar Lesson

MIchael Grammar Leave a Comment

Here is my newest YouTube English Lesson. Let’s check out the difference between the Simple Past and Present Perfect. These two verb tenses can be tricky for a lot of English learners, but I’m going to show you an easy way to remember how to use them! Let’s check it out! I hope you like this lesson…if you do, please take a minute and subscribe to my YouTube Channel! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

English Lesson & Quiz: Using Already & Yet

Michael Uncategorized Leave a Comment

I’ve had a busy day. It’s just 9am now, but I have already done so much. I have prepared my lessons, checked Facebook, Twitter, and Weibo, and made breakfast. Of course, I have already taken Happy for a walk. I was planning to go to the gym, but I haven’t gone yet. Maybe I’ll go this afternoon. We use already and yet with present perfect. Do you know how to use these words? Have a look at the paragraph above, and then check out today’s lesson: We use already with the present prefect to show that something was completed before the time of speaking. Note that already generally comes between have and the main verb. It’s just 9am now, but I have already done so much. I have already taken Happy for a walk. We use yet with the present prefect to show that something was not completed before the time of speaking. Note that yet comes at the end of the sentence. I was planning to go to the gym, but I haven’t gone yet. The train hasn’t arrived yet. We use both already and yet when we ask questions using present perfect. Yet has a neutral meaning. Already …

English Lesson & Quiz: Simple Past Vs Present Perfect

Michael Uncategorized 7 Comments

I had some delicious curry last night. Today, let’s have a look at the difference between how to use the simple past and present perfect. Do you know how to use these tenses? Have a look at today’s lesson and then check your understanding with the quiz at the end of the lesson. Situation #1 – Has the action finished or not? We can use the simple past with for when the action has finished. I worked at that company for 10 years. I don’t work there anymore. Steve lived in Miami for three months. Steve doesn’t live there anymore. We can use present perfect with for or since when the action has not finished. I have worked at that company for 10 years. I still work there. Steve has lived in Miami for three months. Steve still lives there. Situation #2 – Is the time specific or not? We can use the simple past when we know the specific time.   I ate some delicious curry last night. Steve lived in Miami last year. We can use present perfect when we don’t know the specific time. I have seen Casablanca many times. We know his experience, but we don’t know when. …

English Lesson & Quiz: Ever & Never

Michael Uncategorized 3 Comments

Have you ever been to New York City? I have been to several different countries all over the world, but there is something about the atmosphere of the Big Apple that I just love. I have never seen a city that has such a variety of people and authentic cuisines as New York. Here, you can find a restaurant from just about every country or region in the world. We even have ethnic neighborhoods such as Little Brazil, Korea Town, Little Italy, and Chinatown. If you like to eat, you’ll love Manhattan! We use ever, before, and never along with the present perfect to talk about “any time before now.” Do you know how to use these words? Have a look at today’s lesson and then take the quiz to check your understanding. We use ever when we ask questions using the present perfect. The structure is have [someone] ever + PP VERB. We use ever, when we are asking someone about their experience at any time in the past before now: Have you ever been to New York City? Has Fred ever read that book? Have you ever eaten at that restaurant? When we answer this kind of question, …

English Lesson: Past Vs. Present Perfect

Michael Uncategorized 7 Comments

Yesterday I went to my favorite museum, the MET (Metropolitan Museum of Art). I’ve been there many times before, but I still love to go there. I haven’t been there since January, and I am glad I went there this week. There was a special exhibition of guitars. I’ve played guitar since I was a kid, and I spent my childhood surrounded by music.  It was great! If you have never been to the MET, I really recommend it. Today we will look at the simple past tense vs the present perfect tense. Both of these forms of grammar talk about the past, but they are used differently. Do you know how to use them? Take a look at the paragraph above and then check out today’s lesson: The simple past is used to talk about events and situations in the past. The structure is the past form of the verb. When we use the simple past, we usually to indicate the specific time the events and situations took place: Yesterday I went to my favorite museum. We know when – “yesterday” I went there this week. We know when – “this week” I spent my childhood surrounded by music. …

English Lesson: For Vs Since

Michael Uncategorized 2 Comments

I have lived in New York for a long time. Almost for my entire life, except once. I lived in Japan for four years. It was a good experience for me, and I usually go back there once a year to visit. Last year I was busy preparing for Happy English, so I couldn’t go. I haven’t been back to Japan for almost two years. Since my last visit in 2009, one of my students there got married. Even though I haven’t seen her in a while, we still keep in touch. Today, we will look at the difference between for and since when used with the present perfect tense. Do you know the difference? Have a look at the paragraph above once more, then read the following: Present perfect can be used with for and since to talk about something that started in the past and continues until now. Here are two examples: • I have lived in New York for 20 years. • I have lived in New York since 1991. Both of these sentences mean the same thing: I stared living in New York in 1991 (or 20 years ago) and am living here now. For is …

Present Vs. Present Progressive – One Point English Lesson

Michael Grammar 2 Comments

Here on Long Island, we are in the middle of a very cold winter. Today is especially cold. I am looking out the window into my garden. It looks cold! We have had a lot of snow as well. In fact, it snows every week, and it is snowing now. In my house, I am the one who has to shovel the snow. It looks like my neighbor is shoveling his driveway now, while it is snowing. I shovel after the snow has stopped. For today’s English lesson, we will look at basic verb tenses – simple present and present progressive. We will also look a bit at some stative verbs which can be used in simple or progressive forms. Simple Present is used in two ways. First, it is used when we make statements about “general facts”. General facts can be true in the past, in the present, and in the future: It looks cold outside. Today is Sunday. Snow falls from the sky. Secondly, we used simple present when we talk about our habits ore usual activities: I shovel after the snowstorm. My dog eats in the evening. Yalcin studies English an hour a day. Present Progressive is …