Learn English Grammar – Using WAIT

Michael Grammar 4 Comments

I think most people don’t like waiting for things, but if you think about it, we wait all the time. We wait for trains, busses, meetings, and wait for people to do things for us. We wait hours for flights to arrive and concerts to begin. Maybe you have waited to see an English lesson that deals with the verb wait. Well, you don’t need to way any longer. Here it is! There are four basic English grammar patterns when using wait. Today, let’s have a look and practice these. We use wait for + [someone/something] I was waiting for the train in the rain this morning. Can you wait for me? I’ll be ready in five minutes. Jack said he is still waiting for the package from his sister. We also use wait for + [someone/something] + [to verb] I was waiting for the train to arrive. Can you wait for me to go out? I’ll be ready soon. Jack is waiting for the package to be delivered. We use wait + [time] without a preposition after wait. I waited ten minutes for the train. Can you wait five minutes? Jack waited all day, but the package didn’t arrive. …

On YouTube! Verbs & Prepositions: SURPRISED Plus Prepositions – English Vocabulary Word Lesson

MIchael Grammar, Vocabulary Leave a Comment

New on YouTube! Today is Part 13 in my series of lessons to help you increase and remember vocabulary. This month, we are looking at verb and preposition combinations. Today, we are going to study all of the prepositions we can use with the verb, WORK. Click the CC button to see the subtitles and download the transcript of the examples below. Are you ready? Let’s check it out! I hope you like this lesson…if you do, please take a minute and subscribe to my YouTube Channel! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Before, After, Without + VerbING – English Grammar Lesson

Michael Grammar 3 Comments

After the prepositions before, after, and without, we use the VerbING, like this: Please put your dish in the sink after eating. I always have a lot of energy after exercising. Before eating something, please wash your hands. Make sure you have your passport before leaving for the airport. If you go outside without drying your hair, you may catch a cold. Jack played his new X-box game for ten hours without stopping! Also after the prepositions before and after, you can use [subject + verb] , like this: Please put your dish in the sink after you eat. I always have a lot of energy after I exercise. Before you eat something, please wash your hands. Make sure you have your passport before you leave for the airport. Do you always wash your hands after coming home? It’s a good habit to get into, especially in the colder months of the year. If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

AFTER vs. IN To Talk About Time – English Preposition Lesson

Michael Grammar 2 Comments

We use in + time period to talk about a point in the future that is related to now: I’ll see you in thirty minutes. This means 30 minutes from right now. Jack said he will be here in an hour. This means one hour from right now We use after to talk about a point in time in the past or the future that is related to another point in time already mentioned. After does not relate to now. We can use after in the past: I got to the party at 8:00, which was 30 minutes after Jack got to the party.   I took the medicine the doctor gave me and after two days, I felt great! We can use after in the future: I am flying to Miami next week. After that, I am going to Dallas. I will call you after I get home. Now, it’s your turn. How about trying to use after or in in an original sentence in the comment box below? I’ll check it for you. If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks …

English Grammar Lesson – Verb & Preposition Combinations

Michael Grammar 6 Comments

English Grammar has a number of verb plus preposition combinations. One type is the phrasal verb.  Phrasal verbs such as turn on, back up, & pick up are idiomatic. However, there are other types of verb plus preposition collocations which are not idiomatic; they are just as I like to think of them, “set phrases.” These are set phrases that you simply have to memorize. Today, I am going to show you some of these collocations with example sentences: agree with [someone] I don’t agree with Jim. agree on [something] We can not agree on this contract unless you change the terms. agree to [verb]  We agreed to meet again next Tuesday. apologize for [something] I apologized for the mistake. apologize to [someone] I have to apologize to the boss for the trouble. appeal to [someone] We appealed to the CEO, but the company’s decision was final apply for [something] I am going to apply for a truck driver’s license. approve of [something] I do not approve of smoking in this office. argue with [someone] Jack has been arguing with his wife recently. argue about [something] They usually argue about money. If you know anyone who might be interested in …

AT, ON, & IN To Talk About Time – English Grammar Practice for TOEIC & LIFE

MIchael Grammar Leave a Comment

Prepositions can be tough to use, but these are essential for anyone who’s taking the TOEIC exam. Here are the 3 key points you need to remember when you use prepositions about TIME: We use at before clock time. The meeting will begin at 1:45pm. Please arrive at 9:00am to begin work. We use on before a day. The staff meetings are held on Tuesdays. The CEO is coming on September 10th. For all larger division of time (months, seasons, years, etc) we use on. In summer, we have a three week vacation. The company started in the early 1900’s. Here is a YouTube lesson that you can watch to get a more detailed explanation and other example sentences: I hope you like it…if you do, please take a minute and subscribe to my YouTube Channel! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

AT Sounds Like AD – Natural American English Pronunciation Lesson

MIchael Pronunciation, YouTube English Lessons Leave a Comment

Welcome to today’s YouTube lesson! It’s time to take your English pronunciation to the next level! Prepositions in English are generally unstressed and the preposition AT is often pronounced as AD. We’re going to look at some sentences where T is reduced, as well as the natural pronunciation of HIS and HER. I hope you like it…if you do, please take a minute and subscribe to my YouTube Channel!

Besides vs. Except – Confusing English Words Lesson for TOEIC TOEFL and Everyday English!

Michael→ Confusing Words, Grammar Leave a Comment

American English Vocabulary Learn the difference between Besides and Expect Do you know the difference between besides and except? Knowing this will help you in everyday English conversation, and in the TOEFL and TOEIC exams. In this YouTube English lesson, I’m going to show you what these words mean, how they are used and, give you lots of example sentences to help you use them. Check it out! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!