Daily English Idiom – To Get Bent Out of Shape

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To Get Bent Out of Shape What does the English idiom, to get or be bent out of shape mean? Sometimes things don’t go so smoothly in life. If something happens and someone gets upset or angry, you can say that they got bent out of shape. We generally don’t use this idiom to talk about ourself. It is more common to use it to talk about someone else. You can use [be] or [get] bent out of shape. Here are some examples: Jack got bent out of shape because his flight was cancelled. Jennifer’s mom was all bent out of shape because she came home after 2am. The driver got all bent out of shape when a motorcycle scratched his new car. Keep in mind the best way to remember this or any vocabulary in English is to take the word or phrase write it in a sentence that’s true for you or true in your world and then memorize your sentences. You can even take your sentences and write them in the comments below. I would love to see your examples. If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them …

English Idiom “Blow” from Happy English NY

Michael Idioms

Blow is an interesting word which has some idiomatic uses. The standard meaning is of course the movement of air. You can blow out the candles on your birthday cake or listen to the wind blow on a stormy day. As slang, blow also means to leave. Here are some examples: Well, it’s getting late. I think I’m going to blow. (You can say this when you are at your friends house, for example) Why don’t we blow this joint. There is no action here (You can say this when you are at a bar which is very quite. Joint means bar and action means excitement) As an idiom, you can blow your money. This means to loose or spend a lot of money and this has a negative nuance. If you blow your money, you are usually not in a good situation. Gloria blew all of her money in Vegas playing blackjack. Ted blew the money from his paycheck at the bar, so he has no money left for the rest of the week. You can also blow your cool. This means to become upset or angry. Fred blew his cool when someone scratched his new car My boss …

One-Point English Idiom lesson: Get Cold Feet

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Do you have cold feet? Do you get cold feet? If you “get cold feet”, it means that you have some fear and lost your courage. We usually use “get” with this idiom. For example: Ted was going to ask Kim for a date but he got cold feet. I was going to complain to my boss, but I got cold feet. If your feet are really cold, or frozen, then you can’t move. So this is the image we have from this idiom. When was the last time you got cold feet? If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

It’s not raining cats & dogs anymore, it’s pouring

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Did you know that in English we have an expression which goes like this: April showers bring May flowers. This means that all of the rain in the month of may will result in lots of flowers growing in May. Interesting? Well, the main point of this lesson is about rain. Many people who study English have learned the idiom, “It’s raining cats and dogs” which means, “it’s raining very hard.” The truth is, that is a very old expression and we don’t really use it very much, at least not in American English. What we do say, and what you can say in this situation is, “It’s pouring”  Please add this expression to your everyday conversation and leave the “pets” in your notebook ! Is it pouring where you are today? If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Get Something for Peanuts and 9 More Food Related Idioms in American English

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For today’s free English Lesson, we are going to look at ten idioms that use food related words. Have a look at the paragraph above once more and then check the lesson. Get something for peanuts How to use it: [someone] gets [something] for peanuts Explanation: When you get something for peanuts, you buy it for a low price. Example: I got this new computer for peanuts! A cup of joe How to use it:  You can buy, drink, make, etc. a cup of joe. Explanation: Joe is a slang word for coffee and so a cup of joe means a cup of coffee. Example: I like to start my day with a cup of joe. A piece of cake How to use it: [something] is a piece of cake Explanation: Something that is a piece of cake is easy to do. Example: Using computers is a piece of cake for me. Bring home the bacon How to use it: [someone] brings home the bacon Explanation: When you bring home the bacon, you support your family. Example: Jack brings home the bacon. Meat and potatoes How to use it: [something] is the meat and potatoes of a situation Explanation: The …

Hang Out! One-Point American English Idiom Lesson

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Hang out means to spend leisure time doing nothing in particular. When you spend time relaxing at home, in the park or with friends, you can use “hang out.” There are two structures. You can hang out with someone or you can hang out somewhere. Here are some examples I am hanging out with Fred on Friday. Do you want to join us? I can’t hang out with you tomorrow, I have to go to school Johnny is hanging out at Brad’s house tonight It’s a beautiful day. Let’s hang out in the park Where do you like to hang out? Leave a comment and let us know! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Make Up Your Mind – Happy English Idiom Lesson

Michael Idioms 1 Comment

When you make up your mind, it means you decide something. You can make up your mind [to do something] or [about something]: – I made up my mind to go skiing this weekend. – Did Kenji make up is mind about the car? I made up my mind about lunch! I’m having pizza! How about you? If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

A Fish Out Of Water & 9 Other Animal Idioms

Michael Idioms 2 Comments

Here are some commonly used idioms that you can use to make your English sound more natural and less like a textbook. to be like a fish out of water Someone who feels like a fish out of water is in an unfamiliar and uncomfortable situation. as sick as a dog  How to use it: [someone] is as sick as a dog Explanation: Someone who is as sick as a dog is very sick. Example: Bob was as sick as a dog because he caught the flu. cat got one’s tongue How to use it: the cat got [someone’s] tongue Explanation: When the cat got your tongue, you are unable to speak. Example: Jim was pretty quite at the party, so I asked him if the the cat had gotten his tongue. dog days of summer How to use it: [we say this about hot summer weather] These are the dog days of summer Explanation: The dog days of summer are the hottest days in the summer. Example: I’m getting tired of the dog days of summer. drink like a fish How to use it: [someone] drinks like a fish Explanation: When you drink like a fish, you drink a …

Four Money-Related Idioms With Make

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My cousin Suzy has a good job, and makes a living doing computer work. She moved to Manhattan two years ago, but she soon found it hard to make ends meet living alone there, so she decided to get a roommate to help pay the rent. Her roommate makes money in sales, so she can afford half of the rent. The problem is that the apartment is not big, so they have to make do with living in a small space. For today’s free English lesson, I want to show you four English phrases related to money that use the word make. Have a look at the paragraph above once more and then check out the lesson. Make money means to earn or get money. It has a positive nuance of earning a good or high profit: Lori makes a lot of money selling stuff on eBay. It’s hard to make money working as a musician. Momo made money in the stock market and bought a nice house. Make a living means to earn money to live and support oneself and/or a family. We often use a gerund (VerbING) or as + noun after make a living: Jack makes a …

5 Idioms That Use “Hand”

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The hand is a useful part of your body. Don’t you think so? Human hands are special because we have the thumb which gives us the ability to hold things. I’ll bet my dog wishes she had a thumb! Well, before my story here gets out of hand, I want to talk about today’s English lesson. You see, I know English idioms like the back of my hand, and today I want to show you five of them that use the word hand. Are you ready? Lets check it out! caught red handed How to use it: [someone] is caught red handed or [someone] catches [someone] red handed Explanation: When you are caught red handed, you are caught while doing something wrong. Example: Bob was caught red handed sleeping in the office. Joey’s wife caught him red handed with another woman at a cafe. get out of hand How to use it: [something] gets out of hand Explanation: When something gets out of hand, there is chaos. Example: Everyone was arguing at the meeting so it got out of hand. The police came when the protest got out of hand. give someone a hand How to use it: [someone] gives …