Learn English Grammar – Using WISH

Michael Grammar 2 Comments

I remember when I was in elementary school, I used to sit at the kitchen table and do my homework. My grandmother lived next door and used to come to our house in the late afternoons. “I wish I didn’t have to do this homework,” I would complain to her. But her wise response was always the same, “Don’t wish your life away.” I’ve never forgotten that. Wish can be a tricky word to use in English, so today, I will show you how we use this word in your everyday English Conversation. We use wish + were when we imagine that we want a situation to be different than it is. When we wish for things like this, we are just imagining something we do not think is possible: I wish I were taller. I’m not tall, but want to be taller. I wish it wasn’t raining today. It’s raining, but I want it to not rain. I wish I were a better dancer. I don’t dance well at all. Keep in mind that when we imagine something that is possible to happen, we use hope: I hope Jack enjoys his trip to Tokyo. I worked hard on this …

Some Vs. Any – English Grammar Lesson

Michael Grammar 4 Comments

I had some free time today so I thought I would go shopping. I didn’t have any milk at home, so I needed to find somewhere to buy it. When I got to the store I realized I forgot my wallet, and I didn’t have any money. I walked back home, but it was so hot I didn’t have any energy left to go out again. Do you know how to use some and any? A lot of people have trouble with this kind of English grammar, but today I am going to show you how to use these words. In sentences, some and any are used as determiners before a noun. We usually use some in a positive sentence, and any in a negative sentence, like this: Jack has some time tomorrow. I think I will ask him for help. There are some cookies in the closet. Some people in my office speak Japanese. Jack doesn’t have any time tomorrow. I think I will help him. There aren’t any cookies in the closet. There aren’t any people in my office who speak French. We usually use any in questions: Do you have any free time tomorrow? Are there any …

Using Any – English Grammar Lesson

Michael Grammar Leave a Comment

Do you any trouble learning English grammar? I think most people would say that there are at least one or two English grammar points that confuse them. I can’t think of any person who has tried to learn a second language that didn’t have such trouble. Well, if you have any questions about learning English, please feel free to ask me here at Happy English. A lot of students have said they have trouble with the determiner any, so today I am going to show you how you can use any in your English conversation. We use any to talk about a non-specific, infinite number of things.  We usually use any with a plural noun or non-countable noun in questions or negative sentences. Do you have any pens? I don’t have any pens. Do you have any free time? I don’t have any time to talk to her. We also use any in a positive sentence with a singular countable noun or non-countable noun to mean it doesn’t matter which one, it doesn’t matter who, and it doesn’t matter what. In a conversation, we stress the word any. If you ask any person in this office, they will be able to …

Using More With Verbs & Nouns – English Grammar Lesson

Michael Grammar 4 Comments

More people are studying English these days. I guess that’s because in international business, people are using English more. I think a lot more businesses are looking to recruit candidates who can communicate in English. How about you? If you study more, maybe you can get more chances to land a great job. Today, let’s have a look at a few ways to use more. More comes before a noun, so we use more + noun in a comparative sentence: I have more time tomorrow than today. Jack has more books than I do. Jenny ate more pizza than anyone else at the party. We also use more of + proper noun, specifically names of people and places: I saw more of Greg before he got his new job. We visited more of San Francisco on our second trip there. But more comes after a verb, so we use verb + more or verb + object + more. I should study English more…Not, I should more study English. I need to practice golf more. Jack wants to sing more, so let’s stay at the Karaoke bar until 12:00 If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language …

AFTER vs. IN To Talk About Time – English Preposition Lesson

Michael Grammar 2 Comments

We use in + time period to talk about a point in the future that is related to now: I’ll see you in thirty minutes. This means 30 minutes from right now. Jack said he will be here in an hour. This means one hour from right now We use after to talk about a point in time in the past or the future that is related to another point in time already mentioned. After does not relate to now. We can use after in the past: I got to the party at 8:00, which was 30 minutes after Jack got to the party.   I took the medicine the doctor gave me and after two days, I felt great! We can use after in the future: I am flying to Miami next week. After that, I am going to Dallas. I will call you after I get home. Now, it’s your turn. How about trying to use after or in in an original sentence in the comment box below? I’ll check it for you. If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks …

Go To vs. Go For vs. Go VerbING

Michael Grammar 2 Comments

I went for pizza last week with some of my friends. We always go to the same place when we go to have dinner, because the food is awesome. After dinner we went drinking. It was great to spend time with them, and we have a lot of fun. Today, we are going to have a look at some different English Grammar patterns that use go. Ready? Let’s go! We use go + to + verb to show the purpose of our movement: I went to get gas on the way to work. I went somewhere in order to buy gasoline… We went to have dinner at our favorite restaurant. Jack said may go to meet Bob at the pub after work. We also use go + for + noun to show the purpose of our movement: We went for pizza last weekend. It was great! I heard Chris and Dana went for dinner last night. Jack said he may go for a drink with Bob at the pub after work. We use go + VerbING when we go somewhere to do an activity: I’m going to go skiing next weekend with my sister. Jack went surfing for the first …

Have Something Done vs Have Someone Do – English Grammar Lesson

Michael Grammar Leave a Comment

Today, let’s have a look at two ways we use the auxiliary verb have in English grammar. You can have your watch repaired, or have someone repair your watch. Simple, right? Well, today I will show you both of these grammar patterns. The first pattern is have + [something] + PPVerb. Here are some examples: I want to have my watch repaired. You can have your hair cut at that barber for just $10! I think I will have the house painted this fall. When we use this pattern, the object of the verb have receives some benefit from the PPVerb. In my examples above, my watch gets repaired, your hair gets cut and the house gets painted. This English grammar is generally used when we talk about hiring someone to perform a service for us. You usually pay to have your watch repaired, your hair cut, and your house painted. Notice too that these sentences do not say who is doing the repair, cut, or paint job. The person doing the action of the verb is not the main point. However, the result of the action is the main point. The second pattern is have + [someone] + verb …