Some Vs. Any – English Grammar Lesson

Michael Grammar 4 Comments

I had some free time today so I thought I would go shopping. I didn’t have any milk at home, so I needed to find somewhere to buy it. When I got to the store I realized I forgot my wallet, and I didn’t have any money. I walked back home, but it was so hot I didn’t have any energy left to go out again. Do you know how to use some and any? A lot of people have trouble with this kind of English grammar, but today I am going to show you how to use these words. In sentences, some and any are used as determiners before a noun. We usually use some in a positive sentence, and any in a negative sentence, like this: Jack has some time tomorrow. I think I will ask him for help. There are some cookies in the closet. Some people in my office speak Japanese. Jack doesn’t have any time tomorrow. I think I will help him. There aren’t any cookies in the closet. There aren’t any people in my office who speak French. We usually use any in questions: Do you have any free time tomorrow? Are there any …

Using Any – English Grammar Lesson

Michael Grammar Leave a Comment

Do you any trouble learning English grammar? I think most people would say that there are at least one or two English grammar points that confuse them. I can’t think of any person who has tried to learn a second language that didn’t have such trouble. Well, if you have any questions about learning English, please feel free to ask me here at Happy English. A lot of students have said they have trouble with the determiner any, so today I am going to show you how you can use any in your English conversation. We use any to talk about a non-specific, infinite number of things.  We usually use any with a plural noun or non-countable noun in questions or negative sentences. Do you have any pens? I don’t have any pens. Do you have any free time? I don’t have any time to talk to her. We also use any in a positive sentence with a singular countable noun or non-countable noun to mean it doesn’t matter which one, it doesn’t matter who, and it doesn’t matter what. In a conversation, we stress the word any. If you ask any person in this office, they will be able to …

Not Any, No, & None – English Vocabulary Lesson

Michael Confusing Words, Vocabulary 2 Comments

We use not any, no, and none to talk about the absence of something. Today, lets have a look at how these words are used in everyday English. We use not any + [plural noun]. In everyday English, we usually contract not with the be verb or auxiliary verb: There aren’t any people in the meeting room now, so let’s use it. Jack doesn’t know any songs by Bon Jovi, so I will lend him a CD. We didn’t find any bargains at the department store last weekend. We also use no + [noun] to talk about the absence of something. No usually comes after there is / there are & have /has: There are no people in the meeting room now, so let’s use it. Jack has no CD’s by Bon Jovi, so I will lend him one. There was no bathtub in the room at the hotel. We also use none without a noun to talk about the absence of something I looked for an empty seat on the train, but there were none. None means “no seats” I asked Jack if he has any Bon Jovi CD’s but he has none. I wanted a room with a …

Every vs. All – One-Point English Lesson

Michael Confusing Words 2 Comments

We use every + [singular noun] + [singular verb] to talk about all the individual members in a group of things or people: Every film by Humphrey Bogart is a classic. Every report he writes is quite interesting to read. Every glass in that cabinet has a crack or chip. We use all + [plural noun] + [plural verb] to talk about all an entire group of things or people. When you want to talk about a specific group, you can use All of the: All films have a musical soundtrack. All of the films by Steven Spielberg are exciting. All glasses are delicate, and need to be handled with care All of the glasses in that cabinet have a crack or chip. Note the difference between every + [time] and all + [time] Every morning I eat yogurt and cereal (every morning means, Monday morning, Tuesday morning, etc…) I work hard all morning (all morning means from the time I wake up until noon) What do you usually have for breakfast every morning? Are you busy all morning? If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this …

Free English Grammar Lesson – Using Much

Michael Grammar 3 Comments

I like listening to music, especially rock and jazz. I don’t listen to much country or pop music, but I to like some classical music. I don’t watch much TV, because I don’t like commercials much. Listening to music is much more enjoyable than watching TV. A lot of people have said they have trouble with much. How about you? Today I am going to show you how to use much in your English conversation. Much is used as a determiner before a noun, especially in a negative sentence and questions: I don’t watch much TV these days. Jack said he usually doesn’t drink much wine. We didn’t get much snow in NYC last winter. Keep in mind we generally don’t use much in a positive sentence, unless we use much with too and so: Jane said she drank so much wine last night. My dog has too much energy, so we walk her twice a day. We also use much as a pronoun: Bob said there was a lot of pizza at the party, but he didn’t eat much. Joe said there was a lot of litter in the park, but I didn’t see much. We use not much …

Confusing English Vocabulary – SO Vs. SUCH

Michael Confusing Words, YouTube English Lessons 4 Comments

A lot of students have trouble with “so” and “such.” These words have similar meanings, so it is easy go mix them up. However, “so” and “such” are used differently, with totally different grammar. For today’s English lesson, I’m going to show you how to use “so” and “such.” Check it out! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

One-Point English Grammar Lesson: Any or Some?

Michael Uncategorized 3 Comments

You can use both any or some as a determiner before a plural countable or non-countable noun. We use some in positive sentences, like this: Jack has some blank CDs. I think I will ask him for a few. There are some dog treats in the closet. Some people in my office live in the suburbs. We use any for negative sentences. Jack doesn’t have any blank CDs. I think I will give him a few. There aren’t  any dog treats in the closet. There aren’t any people in my office live in the suburbs. We usually use any for questions, but some is also possible for questions Does Jack have any blank CDs? Are there any dog treats in the closet? Do you have some money I could borrow? Do you have a lot of time to study English? Are some of your friends also studying English? How about studying English with Michael or Jackie? We are available for private English lessons in New York, and online via Skype. Also, check out Michael’s newest book & audio podcasts, 109 Phrasal Verbs

One point English Lesson: Another Vs. Other

Michael Uncategorized 2 Comments

Another and other are similar words that are often confused. Let’s have a look at how these words are used. We use another when we talk about “one more of the same thing” that was already mentioned. I had a cup of coffee, but I want to have another cup (one more cup). I have two computers. One is in my office and another one is in my house (one more computer). Jim is rich. He has a house in Manhattan, and another one in LA. We also use another when we talk about “a thing that is different” from the thing that was already mentioned. I had a cup of coffee, so I would like another drink (a different drink) The pizza shop was closed on Sunday, so I went to another one (a different pizza shop). Jack has a sales job during the week, but he has another job as a waiter on the weekend. We can also use other when we talk about “a thing that is different” from the thing that was already mentioned. However, we use other with a determiner such as some or the. I had a cup of coffee, so I would like …

One-Point English Lesson: All/All of, Some/Some of, etc

Michael Grammar 2 Comments

#1 You can use these words All / some / any / most / much / many / little / few + a plural or uncountable noun All cars have four wheels. Some people have short hair. I don’t have any time for lunch today. Most dogs are very friendly. There were many tourists in Times Square. #2 You can use these words All / some / any / most / much / many / little / few + of. When you use of with these words, you must use a determiner such as the, these, my, his, Jim’s, etc All of the cars in this parking lot are clean. Some of the people in this office have short hair. I like cupcakes, so I’ll take any of those cupcakes for dessert. Most of the dogs in this park are very friendly Many of the tourists in Times Square are from a foreign country. *You can not use these words All / some / any / most / much / many / little / few + of + a noun Most of people ~ Some of Americans ~ How about all of your friends? Or some of your coworkers? Leave …