English Idiom Goof Off! From Happy English NY

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Are you a goof off? Do you know someone who is a goof off? If you are a goof off, you are not serious about your work, or lazy, or more interested in playing than working. In this case, goof off is used as a noun.      -She used to be a goof off in high school, but became a serious student when she go to college      -Frank is such a goof off. He never finishes his work on time. We can also use goof off as a verb and it has the same meaning. For example:      -Angela got fired from her job because she goofed off all time and missed a lot of deadlines.      -If you keep goofing off, you won’t get into a good university. Turn off the XBOX and go do your homework! Do you know someone who is a goof off? Did you goof off in high school? Leave us a comment here! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

English Idiom “Spring Fever” From Happy English NY

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Do you have spring fever? A lot of people get spring fever this time of year. But don’t worry, you don’t need to go the doctor if you get spring fever. If you have spring fever, it means that because of a nice warm and usually sunny spring day, you don’t feel like working or studying. You find it hard to concentrate on your work, and you may even not go to school or work that day. Or you may leave school or work early. I always get spring fever. I love the warm weather and love how it sometimes makes my mind drift…. Do you have spring fever? Do you know someone who does? If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Idiom Lesson “feel no pain” From Happy English NY

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T.G.I.F! Since it’s Friday, and this is the day when many people tend to go out and party, I thought we can look at another drinking-related expression. If you are feeling no pain, it means you are drunk. Pay attention to the structure. We use [to be] + feeling no pain:      – After a few beers, Tommy was feeling no pain last night.      – Are you ok? You look like you are feeling no pain! When was the last time you were feeling no pain?

Idiom Lesson “Three sheets to the wind” From Happy English New York!

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After a few cocktails, or beers, you may be three sheets to the wind. Have you heard this idiom? Three sheets to the wind means drunk. This idiom comes from the olden days of sailing. The word “sheet” on a sailboat refers to the ropes that are used to hold and adjust the sails. If the “sheets” on the boat are loose and flapping in the wind, then the sails will flap about, much like a drunken sailor. Thus, the expression three sheets to the wind came to mean being drunk. The structure is very clear. Use the expression “three sheets to the wind” the same way you use the word drunk: – After two bottles of wine last night, Lori was three sheets to the wind. (Lori was drunk) – You look like you are three sheets to the wind. You’d better not drive. (You look like you are drunk) We do not use this expression as an adjective, so you can’t say, “Look at that three sheets to the wind guy.” When was the last time you were three sheets to the wind? If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not …

English slang lesson “bonehead” From Happy English New York!

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English Slang on Saturday: Bonehead is a word (noun) we use to describe a person who is particularly stupid, foolish, or unthinking. -Brad is such a bonehead. He always parks his car in front of my driveway. -What a bonehead! Why are you walking your dog where the sign says “no dogs?” We can also use bonehead as an adjective to describe a stupid or foolish action. -I left my keys in my office again. What a bonehead thing to do! Do you know someone who is a bonehead?

Idiom Lesson “Eager Beaver” From Happy English New York!

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When you see a beaver building a dam or a nest, they seem to be very enthusiastic about doing the task. When a person is very eager to work on something, or on the job, we say he or she is an eager beaver. -Frank is always the first person in the office in the morning and the last one out in the evening. He is such an eager beaver he will probably get a promotion. -Alice was an always an eager beaver in school. Her teachers loved her for her hard work and enthusiasm. Do you know someone who is an eager beaver? If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Idiom Lesson “Couch Potato” From Happy English New York!

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Are you a couch* potato? Many people these days are. Can you guess the meaning from the image? If you put a potato on a couch what does it do? Nothing! So, if you are a couch potato, it means you spend a lot of time sitting on the sofa doing nothing but watching TV or playing video games. -Lee has been a couch potato ever since he got that XBOX 360 -I was a couch potato on Sunday. It was very relaxing. Are you a couch potato? Leave a comment and let us know *Couch is another word for sofa

One-Point English Idiom Lesson – On a Roll

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Are you on a roll? When you are on a roll you are experiencing success after success. You have a series of successes. When you use this idiom, the grammar pattern is always on a roll. We can’t say “on the roll,” or any other variation. Plus, we almost always use to be on a roll. The team is on a roll. They won 6 games in a row. Everything is going great for Jane, she’s on a roll. The comedian told one funny joke after another. He was really on a roll. I hope you all will be on a roll this week. Keep studying!