Early vs. Quickly – English Vocabulary Practice

MIchael Confusing Words, Grammar Leave a Comment

The words EARLY and QUICKLY can be confusing for a lot of English learners because sometimes these two words translate into one word in another language. Does that happen to you too? Well, for today’s English lesson, let’s check out how to use these words and end your confusion! I hope you like this lesson…if you do, please take a minute and subscribe to my YouTube Channel! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

5 Ways To Use TOO – English Grammar Practice for TOEIC & LIFE

MIchael Grammar, YouTube English Lessons Leave a Comment

Too is an interesting adverb and there are actually five different grammar patterns that you can use with too and much too. Well, this something that comes up on the TOEIC as well as everyday conversations. Here are the 5 key points you need to remember: You can use too followed by an adjective. I can’t go to the gym today because I’m too tired. Emily wanted to go there, but she said it was too far. You can use too followed by an adverb. The new teacher speaks too quickly. Traffic is moving too slowly this morning. You can use much too followed by an adjective or much too followed by an adverb. Kim wanted to go there, but she said it was much too far. Traffic is moving much too slowly this morning. You can use too many followed by a countable noun or too much followed by a non‐countable noun. Nicole said she has too many bills to pay this month. Eating too much junk food is not good for your health. You can use too much after the verb I’m worried about Jack. He smokes too much. I think Vincent works too much. Here is a YouTube lesson that you …

Confusing English Vocabulary – Almost

Michael Confusing Words, YouTube English Lessons 7 Comments

The adverb “almost” can be tricky to use in English, and a lot of English learners seem to have trouble with it. How about you? Well, for today’s English lesson, I’m going to show you some of the most common ways we use “almost.” Check it out! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Confusing English Vocabulary – SO Vs. SUCH

Michael Confusing Words, YouTube English Lessons 4 Comments

A lot of students have trouble with “so” and “such.” These words have similar meanings, so it is easy go mix them up. However, “so” and “such” are used differently, with totally different grammar. For today’s English lesson, I’m going to show you how to use “so” and “such.” Check it out! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Confusing Adjectives With Adverb Forms – English Grammar Lesson

Michael Confusing Words, Grammar 1 Comment

When I moved in to my new office, it was pretty bare. There was just a desk, table, and two chairs. I didn’t waste any time to decorate it. I was barely there a week and had put up the Happy English sign, a clock, and a nice poster on the wall. Lately, I’ve been thinking of how else I can decorate it. I stopped by the poster shop on the way in, but I didn’t have much time to look. I didn’t want to be late for class so I thought I could go back another day. Yesterday, we had a look at hard and hardly, the adjective and adverbs that are formed with the same word, but have different meanings. For today’s English lesson, I would like to show you three other common adjectives that take on a different meaning when they become adverbs. Have a look at the paragraph above once more and then check out the lesson. Bare is an adjective which means simple or without any decoration. As well, the adjective bare means naked or unclothed. The room was bare when I moved in to the office. I put a poster on the bare wall …

Adverb Lesson – Instead of Very, Use Fairly, Pretty, Quite, & Rather

Michael Grammar 3 Comments

The weather here in NY has been quite cold recently. Usually, winters here in the Big Apple are fairly cold and snowy, but this year we’ve had pretty cold temperatures and a rather large amount of snow. I’m very tired of this weather, and hoping spring will come soon… I’m sure a lot of Happy English readers know how to use very, but there are a few other words that you can use in your everyday English that function just like very. I’m going to show you these words today. Fairly is the weakest of these adverbs. We use fairly before an adjective or another adverb: Jack plays golf fairly well, considering he just started playing last year. Jenny’s French is fairly good. I’m sure she’ll have no trouble during her business trip to Paris. Quite is a bit stronger than fairly, and can also be used before verbs and nouns. Using quite before a verb or noun is more common in British English than American English. I was quite tired last night so I went straight to bed. Paul knows football quite well, so if you want to know the rules, just ask him. I quite like spending time …

Free English Grammar Lesson: Using Even

Michael Grammar 6 Comments

My friend Yalcin is a pretty talented guy when it comes to computers. He knows all of the popular programs and he can even repair computers. He’s from Turkey, so he speaks Turkish and English. He even speaks a little Japanese! We went out for pizza last weekend, and a lot of our old friends came with us. Even Jim came, and he doesn’t like pizza so much. A lot of students have trouble using even. Today, I’m going to show you the grammar we use with even so you can use this word in your English conversations. We use even as an adverb when we want to say that something is more than what we expect. Generally, even comes before the verb: Yalcin even repairs computers. Jack even knows how to speak French. We saw all of the attractions in the amusement park. We even rode the Ferris Wheel. Even can also come before the subject of the sentence or other words we want to emphasize: Even Jim came to the restaurant, and he doesn’t like pizza. Nobody was able to fix it. Even Tom couldn’t do it, and he knows a lot about cars. I work every day, …

Using So & Such – English Grammar Lesson

Michael Uncategorized Leave a Comment

This has been such a warm week. It was so warm today, that I saw people walking on Broadway wearing just T-shirts. It’s hard to believe it is really February. It was so cold last winter, and we had so much snow. However this year, we have had so little snow or rain. I heard on the news that scientists are saying that since we have had such a mild winter, we may have a lot more insects this summer. That’s not so good!   So and such have similar meanings, but are used differently. Do you know how to use these words? Have a look at the paragraph above and then check your understanding with the quiz at the end of the lesson. We use so with adjectives to mean “very”. The structure is [so]+[adjective]. Here are some examples: It was so warm today, that I saw people walking on Broadway wearing just T-shirts. It was so cold last winter in New York. I’m so happy you are studying with me here We use such with adjectives before nouns to mean “very”. The structure is [so]+[adjective]+[noun]. Here are some examples: This has been such a warm week. We had …

English Lesson & Quiz: Using Too

Michael Uncategorized 1 Comment

It’s pretty cold here in New York today. For me, it’s too cold. And it’s raining, which I guess is better than snow. Last winter there was too much snow, and too many snow storms. Because we had a cold winter last year, the snow melted too slowly. So far this winter it has only snowed once. I love the warmer weather, but spring is too far away. There is too much time between now and the warm days of spring in New York. We use too to talk about situations where there is more (or sometimes less) of something than what we want or need. Do you know how to use this word? Have a look at the paragraph above and then check out today’s lesson. We use too to show that there is more (or sometimes less) of something than what we want or need. If you use too, it shows that you are not satisfied about that situation, so too is often used when we complain. There are three patterns that you’ll need to memorize, so let’s look at these patterns and some examples: Pattern #1. Use too + adjective. Too works like very – it makes …

English Lesson: Used to, Still, Anymore

Michael Uncategorized 2 Comments

I used to work in the music business. In fact, I had my own company where I used to teach and publish music. That was a lot of fun, although I don’t do it anymore. Of course, I still play the guitar and I still love listening to all kinds of music. I used to go to a lot of concerts when I was younger, and even though I don’t go so often anymore, I still love live music. When you want to talk about past habits or conditions, you can do so with used to, still, and anymore. Do you know how to use these words? Take a look at the paragraph above and then check today’s lesson: We use used to + present verb to talk about things we did in the past, and situations in the past that no longer exist in the present. I used to work in the music business. I am not in this business now Lori used to live in Brooklyn. She doesn’t live there now. Gasoline used to be $1 per gallon. It is not that price any more. When you want to emphasize that you are now doing something you usually …