Using When – English Grammar Lesson

Michael Grammar Leave a Comment

I always ask my friend Yalcin when I have a problem with my computer. He’s an expert in computers. So I gave him my laptop, and he said he would call me when it’s fixed. When you need something done, it’s a good idea to get the right help from the right person. Today, I want to show you the English grammar we use when we use when. Have a look at the paragraph above one more time, and then take a look at the English lesson and examples below. We use when to talk about two situations that happen at or around the same time. If you use when in the first part of the sentence, use a comma before the second part. When I miss a deadline, the boss goes crazy. Jack said that when he left the house, it was raining hard. I called her when I got home. I send the report when the boss asked me to. We use when with a present verb to talk about the future. Be careful! don’t put will after when. I will call you when my flight lands. Not, …when my flight will land. When you get back home, please …

Still vs. Yet – English Grammar Lesson

Michael Grammar 4 Comments

It was pretty warm here in New York yesterday. In fact, it is still warm today. We have had some summer-like weather even though it is not officially summer yet. Actually, it is still spring. I do love the summer weather, especially since I live close to the beach. Up until this weekend the weather has been cool and rainy, so I haven’t been to the beach yet this year. I loved going to the beach when I was a child, and I still do. Maybe I haven’t grown up yet! Today we will look at still and yet. Do you know the difference? Have another look at the paragraph above and see how I used these two words. We use still when we want to show that some situation started in the past and continues to now. We use still in in sentences and questions, like this: It was warm yesterday and it is still warm today. (the warm weather has continued since yesterday) I started working on this blog last year, and I am still writing lessons here. I was born in New York and I still live here. I remember you played tennis in high school. Do …

Early vs. Fast vs. Quickly – English Vocabulary Lesson

Michael Confusing Words 2 Comments

Have a look at these two sentences. Can you find the difference between early and fast? The train was early. The train was fast. When you want to talk about time, use early. Early refers to clock time, and means not late. It has the nuance of “before the scheduled or appointed time.” I was early for work today and the boss was happy. The bus arrived a few minutes early, so I had time to buy the newspaper. The party starts at 6:00, but if you want to come early to help set up, I don’t mind! When you want to talk about speed, use the fast. Fast refers to the speed something travels at and can be used as an adverb or an adjective. You can also use quickly, which is an adverb. Jack is a fast driver, so sometimes driving with him makes me nervous. Jack drives quickly, so sometimes driving with him makes me nervous. New Yorkers tend to walk fast. New Yorkers tend to walk at a fast pace. New Yorkers tend to walk quickly. Do you usually arrive at work or school early? Do you walk fast? Are you a fast learner? If you …

Early vs. Quickly – English Vocabulary Practice

MIchael Confusing Words, Grammar Leave a Comment

The words EARLY and QUICKLY can be confusing for a lot of English learners because sometimes these two words translate into one word in another language. Does that happen to you too? Well, for today’s English lesson, let’s check out how to use these words and end your confusion! I hope you like this lesson…if you do, please take a minute and subscribe to my YouTube Channel! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Hard vs Hardly – Adjective & Adverb English Lesson

Michael Confusing Words, Grammar Leave a Comment

I hope you like the video…if you do, please take a minute and subscribe to my YouTube Channel! Here is the text version of this lesson: Many adjectives become an adverb by adding ly and the meaning basically stays the same: Tommy is a quick runner….He runs quickly Tomoko is a beautiful dancer….She dances beautifully. Jack is a slow worker….He works slowly. For today’s English lesson, we are going to have a look at one word that is an exception to this rule, Hard is used as both an adjective and an adverb, but the meanings of hard as an adjective, and the meanings of the adverbs hard and hardly are different from each other. Let’s have a look at all of this. As an adjective, hard has basically two meanings. First, hard means solid, firm, or not soft: The sofa is soft, but the table is hard. The bread became hard because I forgot to put it in a plastic bag. I think this steel is too hard to drill through. In addition, the adjective hard means difficult: It was a hard exam, but I was able to get a good score. Having a pet is hard work, but …

5 Ways To Use TOO – English Grammar Practice for TOEIC & LIFE

MIchael Grammar, YouTube English Lessons Leave a Comment

Too is an interesting adverb and there are actually five different grammar patterns that you can use with too and much too. Well, this something that comes up on the TOEIC as well as everyday conversations. Here are the 5 key points you need to remember: You can use too followed by an adjective. I can’t go to the gym today because I’m too tired. Emily wanted to go there, but she said it was too far. You can use too followed by an adverb. The new teacher speaks too quickly. Traffic is moving too slowly this morning. You can use much too followed by an adjective or much too followed by an adverb. Kim wanted to go there, but she said it was much too far. Traffic is moving much too slowly this morning. You can use too many followed by a countable noun or too much followed by a non‐countable noun. Nicole said she has too many bills to pay this month. Eating too much junk food is not good for your health. You can use too much after the verb I’m worried about Jack. He smokes too much. I think Vincent works too much. Here is a YouTube lesson that you …

Confusing English Vocabulary – Almost

Michael Confusing Words, YouTube English Lessons 7 Comments

The adverb “almost” can be tricky to use in English, and a lot of English learners seem to have trouble with it. How about you? Well, for today’s English lesson, I’m going to show you some of the most common ways we use “almost.” Check it out! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Confusing English Vocabulary – SO Vs. SUCH

Michael Confusing Words, YouTube English Lessons 4 Comments

A lot of students have trouble with “so” and “such.” These words have similar meanings, so it is easy go mix them up. However, “so” and “such” are used differently, with totally different grammar. For today’s English lesson, I’m going to show you how to use “so” and “such.” Check it out! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!