2 – Casual English Greetings – One Point English Lesson

Michael Conversational Phrases Leave a Comment

I was in Roosevelt Field Mall doing some last minute Christmas shopping yesterday when I heard someone call my name. I turned around and it was my friend Tommy from university. “Hey Michael, what’s up?” he asked. “What’s up?” Well, that’s a very good question. Actually, in conversational American English, this is a pretty common way to greet someone and start a conversation. Especially when we greet people we know we often start the conversation off with this sort of question. There are two types of these questions we use as greetings. One type begins with “what” and the other begins with “how.” Today’s free one-point English lesson will look at  both of these essential conversation starters. Let’s begin with some examples of “what” greetings: What’s new? What’s going on? What’s up? What’s shaking? In a greeting, each of these has exactly the same meaning and usage. They are interchangeable when used as a casual greeting and a conversation starter. Let’s look at the reply. You have a few choices in terms of how you reply. Here are a few examples. A: What’s new? B: Not much, how about you? A: What’s up?  B: Nothing special. What’s up with you? …

1 – Are you “bored” or “boring?” One Point English Lesson

Michael Confusing Words 1 Comment

Check out this conversation between two friends: Bob:  “Hey Tom, How’s it going?” Tom:  “Hi Bob. Pretty good. Hey, how was Tony’s party last night?” Bob: “Well, actually I was pretty boring.” Tom: “Huh?” Tom was surprised with Bob’s answer. Do you know why? Well, it’s because Bob said he was “boring!” The target point of today’s free English lesson is “bored” vs. “boring.” Words like bored, excited, interested, amazed, disappointed, etc. describe how a person feels about something. Words like boring, exciting, interesting, amazing, disappointing, etc. describe the reason a person has a certain feeling about something. For example: The party was boring, so I was bored.  ( I was boring is not correct here) The roller coaster is exciting, so I am excited.  This lesson is interesting, so I am very interested in it. So,  in our example conversation above, Bob said he was “boring.” If Bob was “boring” then it means he was the reason and the cause of the feeling. But this wasn’t the case. Bob was trying to explain his feeling, and we always use “~ed” to describe a feeling. Bob should have said, ” I was pretty bored.” If Bob is “boring,” I certainly don’t want to go to a party with him!   Here is …