Idiom Lesson “Give it a shot” From Happy English New York!

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When you are ready to try something new, you can say you will give it a shot. The thing you are trying always goes in the middle, so the structure is give + [something] + a shot: – I’ve never gone snowboarding, but I think I want to give it a shot – If you don’t want to wear glasses, why not give Lasik a shot? You can also use this idiom to talk about people when it comes to a person joining a company or a team. -I just interviewed 3 people for the job, and I think I will give Brad a shot. (This means that among the three, Brad is the person you will give the job to.) -Hey coach, why don’t you give me a shot? (When you want to join a sports team, you can ask the coach to let you play using this idiom) Be careful! The structure is always give + someone/something + a shot. I have heard some students say things like, “I gave a shot to snowboarding.” This is not the correct structure. We don’t give a shot to something, we  give something a shot! So, it has to be, “I …

SH /ʃ/ vs S /s/ Pronunciation – Dangerous English

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Do you have dangerous English? Check out one of my classic YouTube English lessons about pronunciation! I hope you like it…if you do, please take a minute and subscribe to my YouTube Channel! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Idiom Lesson “Couch Potato” From Happy English New York!

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Are you a couch* potato? Many people these days are. Can you guess the meaning from the image? If you put a potato on a couch what does it do? Nothing! So, if you are a couch potato, it means you spend a lot of time sitting on the sofa doing nothing but watching TV or playing video games. -Lee has been a couch potato ever since he got that XBOX 360 -I was a couch potato on Sunday. It was very relaxing. Are you a couch potato? Leave a comment and let us know *Couch is another word for sofa

One-Point English Idiom Lesson – On a Roll

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Are you on a roll? When you are on a roll you are experiencing success after success. You have a series of successes. When you use this idiom, the grammar pattern is always on a roll. We can’t say “on the roll,” or any other variation. Plus, we almost always use to be on a roll. The team is on a roll. They won 6 games in a row. Everything is going great for Jane, she’s on a roll. The comedian told one funny joke after another. He was really on a roll. I hope you all will be on a roll this week. Keep studying!

One-Point English Idiom Lesson – Sleep On It

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Do you need to sleep on it? When you need some time to make a decision, you can say, “…sleep on it.” A trip to the Bahamas sounds interesting, but let me sleep on it. When you talk to someone who needs time to make a decision, you can also use “…sleep on it.” You don’t need to tell me now. Why do you sleep on it and then let me know. Before buying that expensive car you should sleep on it. When you are the person who is directly saying you need more time, you can also use, I need to sleep on “that.” Bob: Jane, have you decided about the skiing trip? Jane: Not yet, let me sleep on that. But be careful! If you are not the person making the decision, you cannot say “sleep on that.” You need to use “sleep on it” Before buying that expensive car you should sleep on it. (not, “you should sleep on that”) I need more coffee this morning, and I don’t need to sleep on it!

One-Point English Idiom Lesson – Get Trashed

Michael Idioms Leave a Comment

Today’s One-Point English lesson is all about the booze. Are you going to get trashed tonight? Since it’s Friday, I thought I would share this slang/idiom with you. If you get trashed, it means you get get very drunk, something that often happens on the weekends. For the structure, you can use either [be]+trashed or [get]+trashed: Danny was so trashed at the party last night. How many beers did he have? The last time I drank tequila I go so trashed I feel asleep at the bar. Of course if you are planning on getting trashed, please don’t drive. Happy Friday! Happy English! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

One-Point English Idiom lesson: Early Bird

Michael Idioms Leave a Comment

Are you an early bird? I was an early bird this morning. An “early bird” is a person who wakes up early in the morning. We have an old expression that says, “An early bird gets the worm” meaning if you are early, you have the chance to get an opportunity. If you are not an early bird, it may be because you are a night owl. A night owl is a person who stays up late! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

One-Point English Idiom Lesson: Hit the Hay

Michael Idioms Leave a Comment

English Idiom – “Hit the hay.” Hay is the kind of dry grass that horses like to eat. In olden days, beds were stuffed with hay, so when we say “hit the hay,” it means “go to sleep.” It’s 1:00am! Time to hit the hay. I need to hit the hay early tonight because I have to leave the house early in the morning. This idiom has the same meaning as “hit the sack.” “Hit the sack” also means “go to sleep.” A sack is a kind of bag and many many years ago it was used to hold rice or beans. So pillows in those days were basically those sacks filled with something soft. So “hit the sack” means, “hit the pillow,” or more simply, “hit the sack” means “go to sleep.”

Business English Idiom Lesson: Get the Ball Rolling

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When you say that you get the ball rolling, it means that you will start doing something. At home, it could mean that you are going to finally begin some project you have been planning: “You have been talking about fixing the roof for a week. It’s time to get the ball rolling!” In business, you can use this expression when you launch a new project” “Let’s get the ball rolling on this new marketing campaign.” If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!