Writing a journal will help you improve your English!

Michael Uncategorized 6 Comments

I do feel it is important to cover all four language skills as part of your daily studying routine. Every day you should strive to read something, write something, listen to something, and hopefully speak something in English. Listening and reading are probably the easiest because there is a variety of material out there online that you can use to practice listening and many more websites you can go to for reading practice, like this one! Listening and reading cover what I like to call input, where English goes into your brain. Output, or using English, is a bit more challenging. If you are studying English in a non-English speaking country, you know having a chance to use your English is limited. This is where writing a journal will help you. What is a journal? Well, simply it is like a diary, but less personal. A journal is a daily log of your experiences. Here are the basic “rules” to follow when writing a journal: Write something everyday. This is important. Even if you are tired or can’t think of a topic, you should still write something. In these situations you can even write something like, “Today I am too …

English Idioms & Phrasal Verbs About Wearing Clothes

Michael Uncategorized Leave a Comment

Today we’ll have a look at some English idioms and phrasal verbs used regarding wearing clothes. Before you can leave your house, you’ll need to get dressed. You’ll take off your pajamas and then put on the clothes you want to wear that day. We use take off to mean remove clothes and put on has the opposite meaning. Once you have put on something, we would say you are wearing it. Here is an example: I am going to work today, so I need to put on a suit. I don’t usually wear a suit to work, but I have a meeting, so I need to wear one. I will put on my blue suit, a white shirt, and a red tie. The weather isn’t good, so I will put on my raincoat, too. Now, I am ready to leave the house. I am wearing my suit and my raincoat. Once I reach the office, I will take off my raincoat. The office is usually warm, so I will take off my jacket as well. I will put on my jacket once the meeting starts. After work, I am planning to go to the gym. I’ll stop home and …

English #Idiom Lesson: Luck out! @ Happy English

Michael Uncategorized Leave a Comment

Today we will look at an idiom which means being fortunate or suddenly lucky. You can use luck out in both situations. Here’s an example of being suddenly lucky: I lucked out at the train station. I got there late, but the train was also late so I was able to catch it. The show was sold out, but I lucked out at the box office. When I went there, they had a sudden cancellation, so I could get the last ticket. You can also luck out when you play a game or gamble: Joe lucked out in Vegas playing blackjack. I have never been able to luck out when betting on a horse race. Have you lucked out recently? Leave a comment and let us know! 

Telephone Idioms in English From Happy English NY

Michael Idioms, Phrasal Verbs Leave a Comment

There are a number of idioms and phrasal verbs used regarding the telephone and telephone calls. These phrases can be used in business or in everyday English situations. Let’s check them out! Most people these days have cellular telephone. This hand-held portable telephone is called a mobile phone in many parts of the world, but in the USA, in American English, we call it a cell phone. Most people these days have cell phones like the iPhone and Android, which are called smart phones. I have a cell phone. Brad just got a new cell phone. When you want to speak with someone, you call them. (British English also uses “ring”) Call me on my cell phone tomorrow after 5:30. Jack calls his mother once a week. When someone calls you, your phone rings and you answer it. My phone is ringing. (The phone makes a sound because of an incoming call ) The phone is ringing, can someone answer it? Is that the phone ringing? I’ll get it. (I’ll get it means I’ll answer it) While you are having a telephone conversation, you are on the phone. Angelina was on the phone with Brad for over an hour. It …

Phrasal Verbs with “Hang” English Lesson From NY

Michael Uncategorized Leave a Comment

A phrasal verb is a verb followed by a preposition that has an idiomatic usage and meaning. Today, we will look at some commonly used phrasal verbs using hang. When you want to encourage someone to keep positive, you can say, hang in there: Hang in there, Jane. I’m sure you’re going to find a new boyfriend soon. Hang on means to wait for a short time. When you are walking down the street with a friend, you might say: Hang on. I want to run into the bank. When you speak on the phone, and you want the person on the other end to wait, you can ask them to hang on: Hang on, Joe. I’ll call my mom to the phone. When you finish the phone call, you need to hang up the phone. When you hang out, it means you are relaxing and spending time not doing anything specifically. Do you want to hang out at my house tomorrow? I think everyone is hanging out at the pool hall tonight. Let’s go! I know this is a lot to remember, so just hang in there. I am sure you’ll get the hang of phrasal verbs. Where do …

Almost all people (not almost people) like pizza!

Michael Grammar 2 Comments

Do you like pizza? I certainly do! I especially like the pizza at Lombardi’s, the most famous and excellent pizza place in New York. I would guess that almost all people on the planet earth like pizza. And that, my friends, is the point of this lesson. A very common mistake I hear is this: X  Almost people like pizza  X Please be careful, ok… We don’t say almost people. The correct phrase is: Almost all people like pizza  – OR  –  Most people like pizza. ← Both are ok and mean the same thing. How about in your country? What food do almost all people there like to eat? If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

English Idiom “Turn Out” from Happy English NY

Michael Phrasal Verbs Leave a Comment

The English idiom turn out has a few different meanings and uses, so let’s look at these today. In our first example, turn out means to end or finish in a certain way:       -Despite the bad weather, the party turned out alright!       -Have a good meeting with the boss, and let me know how it turns out. Next, turn out refers to the number of people who attend an even. As a noun, it is one word, as a verb it is used as two words:      -They are expecting a huge turnout for the concert tomorrow.      -More than 100 people turned out for the fundraiser. It was great! The next meaning of turn out means manufacture or produce:      -The factory turns out hundreds of new cars every month.      -We turned out 5 handmade rugs at the craft fair last weekend. Have you turned out for something recently? Does your company turn anything out? Let us know! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

English Idiom “Have a ball” from Happy English NY

Michael Idioms Leave a Comment

Are you having a ball? Did you have a ball last weekend? If you have a ball, it means that you have a fun, exciting, and interesting time. You can follow this expression with a gerund (verb+ing). Here are some examples:      -We had a ball at the party last night! Thanks for inviting us.      -I had a ball sailing last summer, and looking forward to doing it again.      -Kids always have a ball when their parents are not home.      -Enjoy your trip to London. Have a ball! We also use the expression, have a blast to mean the same thing as have a ball.      -We had a blast at the party last night! Thanks for inviting us.      -I had a blast sailing last summer, and looking forward to doing it again. When was the last time you had a ball? What were you doing? Where were you? If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

English Idiom “Throw someone a Curve” from Happy English NY

Michael Uncategorized Leave a Comment

Have you ever been thrown a curve? If someone throws you a curve about something, it means that you were surprised in an unpleasant or negative way about something. The structure for this idiom is like this: Throw [someone] a curve (about something)     Here are some examples Angelina’s announcement that she was retiring threw the whole office a curve. Bob threw Betty a curve when he broke up with her. The boss threw me a curve about the new vacation policy. Similar to this is the idiom throw someone for a loop. If someone throws you for a loop, they say or do something unexpected. While this idiom is usually used for something unpleasant or negative, but it can also be used for something positive: The structure is [someone / something] threw [someone] for a loop. Here are some examples: The boss threw me for a loop when he offered me a promotion to manager. Bob threw Betty for a loop when he proposed to her. The news about the earthquake certainly threw everyone for a loop. Have you been thrown a curve recently? Has anyone thrown you for a loop? Let us know!