STOP DOING vs. STOP TO DO – English Grammar Lesson!

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English Grammar Lesson Learn the difference between STOP DOING and STOP TO DO Generally, a verb can be followed by another verb, either the infinitive, which is the to + verb, or the gerund and the meaning is the same. On the other hand, the verb stop followed by the infinitive and stop followed by a gerund has two completely different meanings. For today’s English lesson, let’s have a look at the two ways we can use stop plus a verb.  If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Conversational Phrases with Tell – Sounding Natural in English

Michael→ Conversational Phrases, YouTube English Lessons Leave a Comment

American English Conversations Learn to sound more natural in English! For today’s English lesson, we’re going to look at three conversational phrases that use the verb TELL. Using these phrases your English conversation will help to make your English sound more natural. Check it out! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

15 + Ways To Say Goodbye In English Lesson

Michael→ Conversational Phrases 4 Comments

Goodbye is a word we use when we leave somewhere or someone, but is not the only greeting we use when we part from someone, especially casual conversations. Why not add some variety to your English by using one of these other commonly used goodbyes. You’ll sound more natural when you do. First of all , we use a variety of phrases based on the word, “later.” Here are some of them: Later! Catch you later! See you later! There are some goodbyes that use “later” and are based on rhyming words: Later patater! [puh-tay-ter]! “patater” is an alternate pronunciation of the word potato, which has been altered to rhyme with the word “later.” “Later, patater”! See you later, alligator. Here, the word alligator is pronounced as [al-i-gay-ter] also rhymes with the word “later.” Some people think that “Later, patater” and “See you later, alligator” are corny or old-fashioned, but I like to use them! By the way, you can reply to “See you later, alligator” with “After a while, crocodile!” There are some goodbyes that use have: Have a nice day Have a nice one Have a good day Have a good one Here are some other various goodbyes: …

Fifteen+ Ways To Say Hello In English – Free English Lesson

Michael→ Conversational Phrases 4 Comments

Hello is a typical and well known greeting in English. But its not the only greeting we use in conversation, especially casual conversations. Why not add some variety to your English by using one of these other commonly used greetings. You’ll sound more natural when you do. By the way, in American culture, it’s a good idea to use a person’s name when you greet them. Hello Jack sounds more natural and friendly than just hello, especially if Jack is your friend or coworker. First up is Hey! Hey! is an alternate version of hello or hi. We often use Hey! with someone’s name, like Hey Jack! or one of these other versions: Hey dude! ← This is generally used for saying hello to a guy. Hey guys! ← This is generally used for saying hello to a group of friends, and could be used for men or women or a combination of men and women. Hey man! ← This is generally used for saying hello to a guy. It is also possible to use Hi instead of Hey, so you can say Hi Jack!, Hi Dude!, Hi Guys!, and Hi Man! How are you? is also a pretty standard …

How To Use “Do Me A Favor” Meaning – English Phrase Lesson

Michael Conversational Phrases Leave a Comment

The phrases Do me a favor and Can you do me a favor? are very useful in everyday conversational English. Whenever you need a person’s help, and you want to ask them for help, you can use one of these phrases before you say your request. Saying Do me a favor and Can you do me a favor? makes your request less direct, and is also a signal to let the listener know that you are going to ask them for help. Here are a few examples: In the office Bob: Hey Jack. Can you do me a favor? Jack: Sure Bob, what’s up? Bob: I want to move this table to the back of the room. Can you help me? Jack: Sure. Let’s do it! On the telephone: Jen: Hello? Dan: Hi Jen. It’s me, Dan. Jen: Oh Dan. I’m glad you called. Do me a favor. Tell your sister that I wasn’t able to find the makeup she asked me for. I tried to call her but the line is busy. Dan: Ok, I’ll let her know. At the department store: Cashier: Ok, your total is $35.40. Will that be cash or charge. Customer: Charge please. And can …

Feel Bad vs. Feel Bad For – English Vocabulary Lesson

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Tom said he feels bad for Jack. His girlfriend left him, and he’s feeling down about it. I’m shocked because Tom is the guy who stole Jack’s girlfriend! I can’t believe he doesn’t feel bad about that. I feel bad because I totally forgot Jack’s birthday yesterday. He’s a nice guy. I hope he feels better soon. Today, let’s have a look at the difference between feel bad and feel bad for. Do you know the difference? Look at the paragraph above once more and then check the lesson below. You can use feel bad for + [person] when you feel sad because the person has some misfortune or trouble: I feel bad for Jack because his girlfriend left him. Jenny got laid off from her job. I feel bad for her. There was a terrible storm and many people lost their homes. I fee bad for them. You can use feel bad for + VerbING when you feel sad because you’ve done something wrong: I feel bad for missing your birthday party. She said she feels bad for leaving him, but she doesn’t love him anymore. I feel bad for breaking your nice pen. I’ll buy you a new …

Using “How Come” in English Conversation

Michael Conversational Phrases 3 Comments

A lot of students ask me about directness in English. Generally, Americans tend to speak their opinions and thoughts directly. Sometimes, however, we prefer the indirect approach. This indirect way of speaking happens when we disagree or have the opposite opinion of what was just said. As well, we like to ask for reasons in a more indirect way. Today, I’m going to teach you about the phrase how come, which is a more casual and indirect form of the question word, why. We use how come in place of why in a conversation. Here are some examples: George: I can’t go to Elaine’s party tomorrow. Jerry: How come? George: Because I have to work late. Here’s another example: Dan: Would you like some more coffee? Jenny: No thanks. I’m trying to cut down. Dan: How come? Jenny: Because my doctor said too much coffee is not good for my stomach. We also use how come in place of why in a question. The English grammar for a usual why question is Why + is/are/do/does (etc) + subject + verb/object. The grammar pattern with how come is easy. Just use how come + sentence. Have a look at these examples: …

Doubt vs. Question – Confusing English Words Lesson

Michael Conversational Phrases 1 Comment

I doubt you have seen an English lesson dealing with this point before, so I’ve decided to write this today. Actually, this lesson was inspired by one of my readers from Brazil. He wanted to ask me a question, but he said, “I have a doubt about….” Today, let’s have a look at the difference between these two words. We use doubt as a noun to mean, “a feeling of uncertainty.” We generally use the verb have with doubt. She said she loves me, but I have some doubts about her feelings. Jack said he has some doubts about his ability to finish the project by Friday. I have no doubt that the people who read this website are very interested in improving their English. We also use doubt as a verb with the meaning of, “to feel uncertain about ~” or “to not believe~” She said she loves me, but I doubt she is telling me the truth. I don’t believe she really loves me. After many years believing in his church’s teachings, Jim has started to doubt what they say. Jack has started to not believe what they say. Jack said he doubts his ability to finish the …

Learn English With Gossip Girl TV Program – Part II

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Watching TV programs in English is a great way to improve your English. I always suggest doing so to my students. TV dramas and sitcoms (situation comedy) are the best because those give you the chance to listen to conversational English. It’s also a good way to learn everyday, casual English. For today’s lesson, I’ve taken a few lines from Gossip Girl, season 1, episode 2. Erik and Serena are chatting about her date with Dan. At the end of the date, Dan waved goodbye. 
Erik
: So he waved? I wouldn’t have taken him for a waver. 
Serena: 
No, he was just trying to be funny. I wouldn’t have taken him for a waver means, I’m surprise to hear that he is a waver. We often use this expression when we are surprised to learn about someone’s character or personality. I heard that Jack’s wife caught him cheating on her. I wouldn’t have taken him for a cheater. The salesman told me this was a real diamond, but I later found out it was fake. I wouldn’t have taken him for a liar. Next, Dan is talking to his sister Jenny about the same wave. He uses two useful idioms …

Practical English Lesson: How To Order A Sandwich In NYC

Michael Conversational Phrases 5 Comments

Everybody likes a good sandwich. They are portable, tasty, and generally not very expensive. However, a lot of people have trouble ordering a sandwich in a deli here in New York. Well, don’t worry. Today I’m going to show you how to order exactly what you like. Most sandwiches have three components. First, we have the main ingredient(s) such as meat and/or cheese. Next, is the bread. There are several types of bread including rolls and heroes. Finally, there are the extras, like lettuce, tomato, pickles, and condiments, such as mustard mayonnaise (or just mayo), salt and pepper. So, now that you know the parts of a sandwich, here is the pattern you’ll need to follow when ordering: Can I please have [main ingredient(s)] on [type of bread] with [extras & condiments]? For example, Clerk: Next! Michael: Can I please have roast beef and cheddar cheese on a roll with lettuce, tomato, mayo, salt and pepper? If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!