Cut It Out! – English Conversational Phrase

MIchael Conversational Phrases

What does CUT IT OUT mean? Here is a one-point lesson to help you learn this English! CUT IT OUT is a direct way to tell someone, HEY! STOP DOING THAT! This phrase is very direct, so it’s best not to use it to your boss or teacher! How about you? When was the last time you told someone to cut it out? Leave a comment below and let us know!

You Can Say That Again – One Point Vocabulary Lesson

MIchael Conversational Phrases

YOU CAN SAY THAT AGAIN! We use the phrase “You can say that again!” in a conversation to mean, “I agree” or “I think so too!” Jen: Studying English here is fun! Kay: You can say that again! How about you? Have you used this in your English conversations? Leave a comment below and let us know! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Sooner or Later – One Point Vocabulary Lesson

MIchael Conversational Phrases, Vocabulary

SOONER OR LATER Sooner or later is a conversational phrase and it means eventually or someday. Jack comes to work late too often. Sooner or later, he’s going to get fired. Sooner or later, I’m gonna buy my dream house. How about you? What are you gonna do, sooner or later? Leave a comment below and let us know! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

I Couldn’t Tell Ya – Conversational English Phrase

MIchael Conversational Phrases

I COULDN’T TELL YA! We use the phrase “I couldn’t tell ya!” when we don’t know someting, especially when someone asks us a question but we just don’t know the answer. “I couldn’t tell ya!” means, “I don’t know” or “I have no idea.” How many cats live in Brooklyn? I couldn’t tell ya! I couldn’t tell ya how many times the trains here are behind schedule. The nearest flower shop? Sorry, I couldn’t tell ya.Can you think of an example? How about you? Can you think of an example? Leave a comment below and let us know!

How Come? – A Conversational English Phrase

MIchael Conversational Phrases Leave a Comment

HOW COME? How come is a casual, conversational way to ask “why”. You can use how come as a stand alone phrase or you can make a question with how come by adding a sentence to it. You like to study English? How come? (or) How come you like to study English? You don’t like pizza? How come? (or) How come you don’t like pizza? How about you? How come you like to study English? Leave a comment below and let us know!

Using Casual “Like” For Informal English

Michael Conversational Phrases 2 Comments

I worked a lot last week. I think I was in the office like, 65 hours all together. So when I got home last night I was like, so tired. I feel asleep on the sofa with my clothes on. When I woke up it was like, 5:00am. My roommate was up as well. He was like, “Why are you up so early?” I explained my situation. Like is used in a variety of ways in casual, English conversation. Today, I’d like to show you a few examples of how we use like in this way. Have a look at the paragraph above, and then check out this English lesson. We use like to mean “about.” This like is usually followed by a brief pause. I think the boss is like, 65 years old. It’s like, fifty minutes from NYC to Boston by plane. What a fat dog! It must weight like, 30 pounds! We also use like before a little, so, or too (etc) + adjective to emphasize and draw the listener’s attention to the adjective. This like is also usually followed by a brief pause. I was like, so tired last night that I fell asleep with my …

English Vocabulary Lesson – To Drive vs. To Go By Car

Michael Confusing Words, Conversational Phrases 7 Comments

I always drive to the train station every morning. It takes less than 10 minutes by car, but it would probably take half an hour to walk. I’ve never walked to the station. I take the train from the suburbs to Manhattan. Some of my friends come to work by subway, but there are no subways where I live, so that’s not an option for me. A lot of readers have asked me about the difference between phrases like go by car and drive, so for today’s English vocabulary lesson, I thought I would talk about this point. When the main topic of the sentence is the way or method of transportation, we use phrases like by car, by train, by subway, & on foot. Some of my friends come to work by subway. It takes less than 10 minutes by car. The only way to reach that part of the beach is on foot. However, when the main topic of the sentence is not the way or method of transportation, we generally use expressions with the verb. Have a look at these two sentences: I went to the beach with my friends by car. Here, the speaker wants to …

Shop Around – English Phrasal Verb Lesson

MIchael Conversational Phrases, Phrasal Verbs Leave a Comment

Do you like to shop? When you are shopping for something in particular, like a car, a TV, or clothes, do you like to go to different shops to compare prices and items? If so, then you like to shop around. When you shop around for something, you go to several stores to compare what they have and how much they sell that item for. I shopped around for a new camera, and finally got a good one at B&H Camera in NYC. Don’t just buy the first car you see. You really need to shop around! How about you? Do you like to shop around? What was the last thing you shopped around for? Leave a comment and let me know! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Greetings with HOW in English- Natural American English Pronunciation Lesson

MIchael Conversational Phrases, YouTube English Lessons Leave a Comment

Who wants to sound more natural? Everyone! In this YouTube English lesson, we will look at the natural pronunciation of HOW Greetings…like, “How’s it going?” Many people mispronounce this greeting by saying, “How’s going?” How about your pronunciation? Let’s do it! I hope you like it…if you do, please take a minute and subscribe to my YouTube Channel!

When To Use (Or Not Use) WANNA – American English Pronunciation

Michael→ Conversational Phrases, Pronunciation, YouTube English Lessons 1 Comment

American English Pronunciation Lesson Learn to use WANNA I’m sure that you have all learned that wanna is the usual American English pronunciation of want to. Well, did you know that there are some times that you can use wanna, but there are other times that you can’t. For today’s English lesson, let’s look at when we can and when we can’t use wanna. If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!