One-Point English Lesson: Because vs. Because Of

MIchael Confusing Words, Grammar

Be careful of this common mistake in English. We use because of followed by an noun: Because of the rain we canceled the picnic. We got to the party late because of the traffic. On the other hand we use because followed by a subject and verb: Because it was raining we canceled the picnic. We got to the party late because there was traffic. Keep in mind the best way to remember this or any vocabulary in English is to take the word or phrase write it in a sentence that’s true for you or true in your world and then memorize your sentences. You can even take your sentences and write them in the comments below. I would love to see your examples. If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

YouTube English Lesson – ALIVE, LIVE, DEAD, DIED: Learn The Difference!

MIchael Confusing Words, Vocabulary, YouTube English Lessons

What is the difference between ALIVE and LIVE…or… DEAD and DIED? I know it’s not such a happy topic, but there is a difference between how we use this vocabulary and I know it is a confusing point for a lot of English learners. So, take a look at this YouTube English lesson and check it out! Feel free to leave a comment and let me know what you think! I hope you like this lesson…if you do, please take a minute and subscribe to my YouTube Channel! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today! [/x_section]

Learn The Difference Between LEARN And STUDY

Michael Confusing Words, Vocabulary

I guess since you are reading this you are studying English. I know that learning a language is not easy. Some people study for years and still have a hard time. Just about every day I fill up the pixels on your computer with material that hopefully can help you learn something in English. I hope you enjoy studying with me. Learn and study. What’s the difference between these to words? That’s a great question that a lot of English learners have. So today,  let’s take a look at the difference between learn and study. Study is a process. When you study, you use tools such as books and computers in order to help you get information into your head. You study because you want to learn something. I have been studying Japanese for more than 10 years. Teddy is studying to become a doctor. Gina is studying her notes for the history exam this week. Learn is what happens as a result of studying or experience. When you learn something, you have it in your head forever. I learned how to cook Italian food from my mom. It’s hard to learn all of the things you need to know …

Hope vs. Wish – Learn The Difference

Michael Confusing Words, Vocabulary

What is the difference between HOPE and WISH? That’s a great question, and one that a lot of English learners have. That’s because HOPE and WISH have similar meanings. In this one-point English lesson, let’s have a look at the how to use HOPE and WISH in everyday English. We use HOPE when we desire something that is possible or likely to happen. I hope it doesn’t rain today. ← The forecast says rain is likely, but I would be happier if it did not rain. I hope the train comes on time. ← The train is often late, but I would be happier if it did not come late today. I hope the exam is cancelled. ← There is a possibility that the teacher will cancel the exam, and I would be happy if he did so. On the other hand, we use WISH to talk about our desire when the situation is an imaginary situation or not likely to happen. I wish I could have a pet ← The apartment I live in doesn’t allow pets, but I want one. I wish Jane were here ← Jane is not here, but I would like it if she was …

YouTube English Lesson – JOB vs. WORK: Learn The Difference

MIchael Confusing Words, Vocabulary, YouTube English Lessons

What’s the difference between the words WORK and JOB? These are two similar words in English because they have to do with what you do at your work place or when you labor outside of work. In this YouTube English Lesson, I’m going to show you how we use WORK and JOB and also some related phrases using these words, like AT WORK vs. OFF WORK. Leave a comment and let me know what you think! I hope you like this lesson…if you do, please take a minute and subscribe to my YouTube Channel! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

YouTube English Lesson – BRING vs. TAKE – Learn The Difference!

MIchael Confusing Words, Vocabulary

Hey everyone! I know that the verbs BRING and TAKE can be confusing for a lot of learners, so in this English lesson, I’m going to show you the difference between these words and give you a bunch of examples so that you can see how we use BRING and TAKE in everyday English. I hope you like this lesson…if you do, please take a minute and subscribe to my YouTube Channel! If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Beside vs. Besides – Confusing English Vocabulary Lesson

MIchael Confusing Words, YouTube English Lessons

What’s the difference between beside and besides? A lot of English learners ask me that question and it’s a great question. Let’s look at how we use beside and besides in everyday English. First, read the paragraph below: There is a nice café in the building beside the building that my office is in. Besides coffee, they have some nice pastries and cakes, as well as nice New York style bagels. Beside the café, there is a donut shop. I’m not a big fan of donuts. I think they are too sweet, and besides that, they aren’t so healthy! The preposition beside means next to or at the side of. We use generally use beside to show the physical location of something. There is a nice café in the building beside the building that my office is in. John is standing beside his boss in the photo. I put the printer beside my desk in the office. The preposition besides means in addition to or apart from. Besides coffee, they have some nice pastries and cakes. Besides being sweet, I think donuts are not healthy. Besides tennis, Jack plays golf and soccer. How about your example? Why not write some …