English Vocabulary Lesson: Dead vs Die vs Died

Michael Confusing Words 1 Comment

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I know, it’s not a very happy topic. However, a lot of students get confused when they try to use these English vocabulary words: dead, die, and died. Today, I am going to show you how these are used in English conversation.

  • Dead is an adjective
    • My tomato plants are dead because nobody watered them when I was away.
    • The police found a dead body in the trunk of the gangster’s car.
  • Die is a verb.
    • If you do not breathe, you will die.
    • More people die in traffic accidents than by lightning strikes.
  • Died is the past form of the verb die. 
    • Jack’s pet mouse died last week.
    • I wonder why these flowers died so quickly.

When we talk about people, we prefer using the phrasal verb pass away more than the verb die. When we talk about the reason a person died, we prefer using die than the phrasal verb pass away. Compare these sentences:

  • Steve Jobs passed away in 2011.
  • John Lennon died of a gunshot wound.

If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

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