One-Point English Lesson: Noun Clauses with If & Whether

Michael Uncategorized 2 Comments

Do you know if anyone will come to the meeting?

You can use if and whether in a noun clause, and we generally use this kind of grammar to ask or answer yes/no questions. Let’s have a look at this topic today!

When asking a question using a noun clause with if, the pattern is do you know + if + sentence. The sentence part can be a present, past, or future sentence:

  • Do you know if this train goes to Times Square?
  • Do you know if Jack passed his exam?
  • Do you know if the next meeting will be in New York?

When answering a yes/no question using a noun clause with if, the pattern is I don’t know + if + sentence. As in the question, sentence part of the answer can be a present, past, or future sentence:

  • I don’t know if this train goes to Times Square.
  • I don’t know if Jack passed his exam.
  • I don’t know if the next meeting will be in New York.

We also use wonder if in a similar way. The pattern is I wonder + if + sentence, and here too, the sentence part can be a present, past, or future sentence:

  • I wonder if this train goes to Times Square.
  • I wonder if Jack passed his exam.
  • I wonder if the next meeting will be in New York.

Whether can be used instead of if with the same meaning. It’s also possible to use whether + or not. In a question, the phrase or not comes directly after the word whether:

  • Do you know whether or not this train goes to Times Square?
  • Do you know whether or not Jack passed his exam?
  • Do you know whether or not the next meeting will be in New York?

In a sentence, the phrase or not can come directly after the word whether, or at the end of the sentence

  • I don’t know whether or not this train goes to Times Square (or) I don’t know whether this train goes to Times Square or not.
  • I don’t know whether or not Jack passed his exam.
  • I don’t know whether the next meeting will be in New York or not.

Lastly, you can also use the phrase or not with if. When you do, or not comes at the end of the sentence, and we only use or not with if in statements (not questions):

  • I don’t know if this train goes to Times Square or not.
  • I don’t know if Jack passed his exam or not.
  • I don’t know if the next meeting will be in New York or not.
  • I wonder if this train goes to Times Square or not.
  • I wonder if Jack passed his exam or not.
  • I wonder if the next meeting will be in New York or not.

Do you know if your friends know about Happy English? Why not tell them today!



Enter email address:

 

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them.

Thanks for studying today!

Comments

comments