English Lesson: Believe So, Hope So, & Think So

Michael Uncategorized 2 Comments

We use so with believe, hope, and think in conversations as a response to yes or no questions. So is used to replace a phrase starting with that:

  • Jim: Is Tony coming to the party?
  • Jack: I believe so. I believe that Tony is coming to the party.

Here are some other examples:

  • Jim: Did Bob order the pizza for lunch?
  • Jack: I hope so. I didn’t have breakfast, so I’m really hungry.
  • Bill: Does this train go to Times Square?
  • Jenny: I think so, but to be sure, please ask the conductor over there.

In a negative sentence, we can use don’t believe so, don’t think so, and hope not. We don’t use don’t hope so.

  • Jim: Is Tony coming to the party?
  • Jack: I don’t believe so. He usually works on Saturdays.
  • Bill: Does this train go to Times Square?
  • Jenny: I don’t think so, but to be sure, please ask the conductor over there.
  • Jim: Did Bob order the pizza from Dominica’s Pizza?
  • Jack: I hope not. Their pizza is too greasy. I hope he called Lombardi’s.

Have you used so in conversation like this? Leave a comment below and let me know!



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