One Point English Lesson: Too & Enough

Michael Uncategorized Leave a Comment

When you want to say that an adjective is a higher degree than desirable or permissible, you can use too + adjective:

  • Jack is too young to drink alcohol. This means that Jack is young and younger than the permissible age to drink alcohol.
  • The new iBook is nice, but it is too small. This means that the new iBook is small and smaller than I desire it to be.

Here are some other examples:

  • From here, the Empire State Building is too far to walk to, so let’s take the subway.
  • Jenny was too late for class today and the teacher would not let her enter the class.

You can also use not + adjective + enough, which has the same meaning as too:

  • Jack is not old enough to drink alcohol.
  • The new iBook is nice, but it is not big enough.
  • From here, the Empire State Building is not close enough, so let’s take the subway.

You can also use adjective + enough in a question:

  • Is Jack old enough to drink alcohol?
  • Do you think that suitcase is big enough for your trip?

Do you know anyone who is too young to drink alcohol? Is the new iBook big enough?

 



Enter email address:

 

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them.

Thanks for studying today!

Comments

comments