English Lesson Prepositions with Time: On Time or In Time

Michael Uncategorized 2 Comments

The boss is angry because Jack isn’t on time for work today…again!

When we talk about a person or thing that is not late, we can say the person or thing is on time.

  • I am usually on time for work. I am usually not late for work.
  • I hope the meeting starts on time.
  • Do you think the train will come on time today?

The opposite expression is late

  • Jack was late for work. Jack was not on time for work.
  • Dale said the meeting started late this morning.
  • Do you think the train will come late today?

When we talk about a person or thing that happens with enough time, we use in time.

  • I arrived at the office in time for the meeting. I arrived before the meeting started.
  • I hope we can get to the station in time for the express train.
  • Even though there was traffic, I was in time for the movie.

When we talk about a person or thing that is almost late (but not late), we can use just in time.

  • I arrived at the office just in time for the meeting. I was almost late.
  • We got to the station just in time for the express train.
  • Because there was a lot of traffic, I was just in time for the movie.

Do you usually arrive at school or your office on time, in time, or just in time? Feel free to leave a comment here for us!

How about studying English with Michael or Jackie? We are available for private English lessons in New York, and online via Skype. Also, check out Michael’s newest book & audio podcasts, 109 Phrasal Verbs

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