English Lesson: Suppose Vs. Suppose to

Michael Uncategorized 4 Comments

It’s the end of the sailing season. Even though I’m supposed to pull my boat out of the water by the end of the month, I brought it to the marina yesterday. I suppose I can accept the fact that the summer is over, but I just don’t want to! Suppose I lived in a warmer place than New York. In that case I suppose I could sail all year round. Maybe I am not supposed to think that way, but I suppose it is going to be a long winter.

Today I want to look at how we use the word suppose. Do you know how to use suppose? Have a look at the paragraph above and then check today’s lesson:

Suppose is used to mean “guess” or “assume.”  We usually use suppose + sentence in this way:

  • Jack is an hour late. I suppose he is not coming. I assume he is not coming.
  • I suppose it is going to be a long winter. I guess it is going to be a long winter.
  • Do you suppose the supermarket is open late tonight?

Supposedly is the adverb form of suppose. It can sometime be used to indicate the speaker has some doubt about the topic

  • Supposedly, the Italian restaurant downtown makes excellent lasagna.
  • Frank Johnson is supposedly the best candidate for the new management position.
  • Supposedly all of the students in the class didn’t do their homework.

Supposed to is used when we want to talk about something which is an obligation or duty.

  • Jack is supposed to be at work at 9:00 every morning.
  • In the Northeast, we are supposed to take the boats out of the water by the end of October.
  • All of the students in the class are supposed to do their homework.

I suppose you enjoyed this lesson, and I am supposed to ask you to please let me know your suggestions for a one point lesson here J

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