English Lesson: Phrasal Verbs with “Fill”

Michael Uncategorized 2 Comments

I bought gas today. I usually fill up the tank, but these days the gas prices are falling, so I just filled it up halfway. The guy at the gas station told me if I had their charge card, I could get a small discount on Tuesdays. He said all I needed to do was to fill out the application and he could get me the approval soon. I filled in my name, address and other info and I was good to go.

Today we will look at some phrasal verbs that use fill – fill up, fill in, an fill out. Do you know how to use these words? Take a look at the paragraph above and then check out today’s lesson:

Fill in and fill out are similar, but they are used differently. You can fill out an application or a form, but you fill in your name and address on the form. The structure is fill out + [some form] and fill in + [some information].  For example, these sentences refer to completing a form:

  • I filled out an application for a gas card.
  • If you want to study at Happy English, please fill out this questionnaire.  

The following sentences refer to entering information on a form:

  • There is a lot of information to fill in on a passport application.
  • This form says to fill in your name, address, and phone number.

Fill up means to put something into a container so that all the space in the container is used:

  • I usually fill up the tank with gas.
  • When I cleaned up my attic, I filled up three boxes of stuff that I donated to the red cross

You can also fill something up halfway or part of the way. If you do not mention the amount of the container being filled up, we will assume it is filled up completely.

  • You should fill up the pool halfway and check for leaks.
  • Don’t fill up the box too much, it may break.

Well, I hope I didn’t fill up your head with too much English today. Thanks for reading and feel free to suggest a topic for me to cover here (^0^)

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