English Lesson: Remember + Verb & Wish + Verb

Michael Uncategorized 4 Comments

I remember going the beach in the summer as a kid. My father always remembered to bring that big red and white beach umbrella with the wooden handle. We had such a great time. Even now, I always want to go to the beach, but I wish going there was easier. There is so much to carry, and the parking lot is pretty far from the water. Still, I wish to go there every day! (*see note)

The other day we saw that using the verb stop with an infinitive and using stop with a gerund gives stop a different meaning in each case. Today, let’s look at some other verbs that work this way. Have a look at the paragraph above once more and then check out today’s lesson:

Remember + V~ing means to have an image of something from the past in your mind:

  • I remember going the beach in the summer as a kid.
  • Joe doesn’t remember singing at the party. Maybe he was too drunk.
  • Do you remember playing basketball in the park when we were in high school?

Remember + to + verb means to not forget to do something:

  • My father always remembered to bring that big red and white beach umbrella
  • Joe didn’t remember to bring his karaoke machine to the party. = he forgot to bring it
  • Please remember to remove your shoes when you enter the house.
    Wish + V~ing + be (past) has the feeling of unhappiness about something:

  • I wish going there was easier = It is not easy to go there, so I am unhappy about that.
  • I wish studying math was not so complicated = It is complicated, so I am unhappy about that.
  • I wish sitting in the sun wasn’t so dangerous = It is dangerous, so I am unhappy about that.

Wish + to + verb means to want to do something in the future. However, is used in very formal English:

  • *I wish to go there every day → A sentence like this from the opening paragraph is rarely used in spoken English because it is very formal sounding. We usually use want, like this → I want to go there every day.
  • I wish to speak to the manager.  When you are in a store or restaurant, and have a problem, you can use this kind of sentence. Here is another example:
  • I wish to make a complaint.

Thanks to Misa for suggesting this lesson. I wish to know what your requests and suggestions are for a one-point lesson. Feel free to leave a comment here or click the contact button above to send me a direct message. 

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