One-Point English Lesson: Singular vs Plural Nouns

Michael Grammar Leave a Comment

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I like chicken. Do you? I also like chickens. How about you?  Two interesting questions, right?  “I like chicken” Vs. “I like chickens”. Do you know the difference? Today’s online English Class will give you the answer.

“I like chicken” refers to chicken as a food. If you like chicken, you are talking about food.  “I like chickens” refers to chickens as animals. If you like chickens, you probably like to watch that animal.  When the word for an animal is the same word as the food from that animal, you must use the plural form when you want to say you like the animal. When you want to talk about the food, you need to use the singular form.

Look carefully at these examples. All of these sentences talk about the animals themselves – as pets, for example:
1. I like dogs.
2. Jane likes cats.
3. My sister doesn’t like snakes
4. Chickens are dirty.

Now, look carefully at these examples. All of these sentences talk the food from the animals:
1. I like dog. (This means I like to eat dog meat)
2. Jane likes cat. (This means she likes to eat cat meat)
3. My sister doesn’t like snake. (She doesn’t like to eat the meat from snakes)
4. The chicken is dirty. (Maybe the meat fell on the ground)

So, can you see now how important it is to choose your words carefully?

OK, one last point. The singular and plural form of the word fish is the same. So if I say, “I like fish,” you will need to understand the context of the conversation in order to know whether or not I am talking about food or animals.

If you know anyone who might be interested in this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

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