English Lesson: Until Vs. Unless

Michael Vocabulary 1 Comment

I’m thinking of getting a new cell phone. I have an 4g iPhone now, but it is a bit old and the battery doesn’t last very long. I am considering the iPhone 5g, but I wonder if I should wait until the iPhone 14 comes out. Then again, I think I don’t want a new phone unless it has long battery life and a good camera. What should I do…? Today let’s look at Until Vs. Unless Do you know how to use these words? Have a look at the paragraph above and then check today’s lesson. We use until when we want to talk about a point in time that something happens. Something happens or will happen until a certain time. For example: I waited until 6:30, but Donna didn’t come. So I left the coffee shop. This means that 6:30 was the point in time that I stayed in the coffee shop while waiting for Donna. I wonder if I should wait until the iPhone 14 comes out. This means, the point in time I will wait to buy a new phone is then the iPhone 14 comes out. I have to work until 9 tonight. This means I am going to continue working, and then stop at …

Learn English Vocabulary – Sign Vs. Signature

Michael Vocabulary

When I applied for my driver’s license, I needed to fill out the application form. Then, I brought the document to the window. The clerk said he needed my signature at the bottom of the form. So I had to sign my name. Then he gave me a second document to sign. I didn’t realize they needed my signature in so many places! The words sign and signature can be confusing sometimes. Do you know how to use these words? Read the paragraph above once more and then check today’s lesson: Signature is a noun, and generally means your name written in cursive script. You can write your signature, give your signature, or put your signature, like this: Please write your signature on this form. Can you please give me your signature here? You need to put your signature on every document you approve in this office. Sign is used a verb and means to write your signature. We general use sign with name, as in sign your name. Here are some examples: Please sign this form. Can you please sign your name here? You need to sign ever document you approve in this office. We also have a slang way of asking for your signature. Someone might ask you, “Can I have your …

Learn English Vocabulary – Fun vs. Funny

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I went to a party last night with some of my friends from high school. The party was really fun. My friend Ed is a funny guy, and he always makes us laugh. Having fun and enjoying yourself is important, and good for your health. It helps to have funny people around you, too. Some of my students have told me that I am funny. I think they may be right! The words fun and funny can be confusing sometimes. Do you know how to use these words? Read the paragraph above once more and then check today’s lesson: Fun means enjoyable, so something that is fun is enjoyable. You can say that [something] is fun, or [someone] has fun. Here are some examples: The party last night was really fun. Going to the top of the Empire State Building is fun. You should try it! Having fun and enjoying yourself is important. I had fun at the party last night. You can also use fun before a noun, like this: I went to a fun party last night. New York is a fun city! Funny means something makes you laugh. So if you experience something funny, you will probably …

Learn English Vocabulary – Ago Vs. Before

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I started teaching English a long time ago. Actually, it was 28 years ago when I got my first full time teaching position. I was helping my classmates in college with English a few years before that. I’m not sure if you know this or not, but before I was an English teacher, I was a music teacher. Do you know how to use ago and before? A lot of my students told me that they have trouble with this kind of English grammar so today I am going to show you how to use these words. Ago relates to the present time. Ago indicates a time in the past based on now, and generally it is a specific time. Ago tells us how long prior to now: I started teaching English 28 years ago. Jack got to the office ten minutes ago. Twenty years ago, cell phones didn’t have a display screen. We also use phrases like many years ago, a couple of weeks ago, a few hours ago, etc. to describe a non-specific point in time based on now: Bob started working here many years ago. We got a new car a couple of weeks ago. A few …